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Latin/Adverbial "Eo"

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Question
from Milo 34:

At eo repugnante fiebat, immo vero eo fiebat magis." (Allen&Greenough 420.3)

My Question: the second "eo" is an adverb, isn't it?

Many thanks!

Answer
You could call it an adverb.  It is actually a frozen ablative of degree of difference, frequently used with comparative adjectives, e.g., "eo magis," idiomatically translated in English as "the more," literally, "more by that much."  See Allen & Greenough, Section 414a and the Note.

"But although he [Clodius] was opposing [Milo], yet nevertheless he [Milo] was the more likely to become (consul)."  

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Michael

Expertise

Ph.D. Cand. in Classical Languages. Conversant with all forms of the language: classical, mediaeval, and modern.

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I have 50 years of teaching at all levels of Latin from high school through university postgraduate. I read, write, and speak Latin daily.

Organizations
American Classical League, American Philological Association

Education/Credentials
A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Cand. in Classics.

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