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Latin/Nuance of phrasing

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Hi, I am interested in determining a Latin translation for the idiom "will not let you down." I enjoy the nuances of language and am curious the correct adaptation, since I know there are several words for "disappoint" in Latin, but I am not familiar with the implications of each. I also am unfamiliar with how syntax influences the meaning of a phrase in Latin (i.e., how placement of "you" changes the focus of the action from will not disappoint you to you will not disappoint). I am also unclear on whether or not in Latin a subject is needed, such as "I/he/she/it will not.." or if there is a way to leave it vague and open for interpretation. I know that is a lot of questions...any assistance you could give would be appreciated.
Thanks.

Answer
Hello,

first of all I have to point out that Latin is an inflected language and then any verbs, adjectives, nouns change ending, according to the role in a sentence, so that  any synctatical relationships are indicated by the endings, not by the order of the words.

In short,Latin syntax influences the meaning of a phrase as well as the use of a different subject pronoun that however is almost always omitted in Latin as it is implied in the verb form.

For example:”cogito” means ”I think”, while “cogitas” means “you think”, “cogitat” means “he/she/ thinks”, “cogitamus” means “We think”,“cogitabimus”  means “we will think”, etc.


As for  the placement of "you" that  can  change the focus of the action from e.g. “I will not disappoint you”  to “You will not disappoint me”, the same happens in Latin where “I will not disappoint you”  corresponds to “Te non deludam”, whereas “You will not disappoint me” translates as “Me non deludes”.
As you can see, DELUDAM corresponds to "I will disappoint", while DELUDES corresponds to "you will disappoint", as well as TE corresponds to the object pronoun "you" and ME corresponds to the object pronoun "me".

To conclude, if you want to say :”I will not let you down” in the sense that you do not want to disappoint someone, you must say: ”Te non deludam”,  whereas you should say: “Te non fallam”, if “I will not let you down” is used in the sense that you do not want to deceive/ cheat someone.

Please note that both the sentences “Te non deludam” and “Te non fallam”  are addressing to only one person, while if  you are addressing to more than only one person, you should say:”Vos non deludam” or “Vos non fallam”, simply because Latin uses the pronoun TE in the accusative case for “you” in the 2nd.person singular, but VOS in the accusative for “you” in the 2nd.person plural.

In fact, while in English the pronoun “you” is either a 2nd.person singular or a 2nd.person plural, in Latin there are different pronouns  for “you”, according to the person/persons it refers to and its role in the context.

Please read more below.

Hope I made myself understood. Feel free however to ask me again, should you have some doubt.

Best regards,
Maria
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GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS

-I will....let down =  DELUDAM (1st.person singular, future of the verb DELUDO, I let down/I disappoint) or  FALLAM (1st.person singular, future of the verb FALLO, I deceive/I cheat)

-not= NON

-you =TE (direct object, accusative of the 2nd.person singular pronoun)

As you can see, Latin word order can be different from English, as Latin is an inflected language where synctatical relationships are indicated by the endings, not by the order of the words.

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Maria

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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