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Latin/Libri semper virescit amor

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Libri
Libri  
Hi, I came across this phrase 'libri semper virescit amor' in a book and googled it thinking it might be a famous Latin phrase but nothing came up. I used to study Latin but I am a bit rusty with my grammar. I know it's something roughly to do with books, always and love but not sure what 'virescit' means and how the whole sentence comes together? I don't know if it would make any difference to the meaning of the book, thank you for your help.

Answer
Hello,

the Latin phrase "libri semper virescit amor" used as a motto in a decorative label into a book, often on the inside front cover, means: “Love of the  book always flourishes“  as well as “Love of the book always becomes greater”, just to denote that our love of/for books always grows.

As for a grammatical analysis of this sentence, please read more below.

Best regards,
Maria
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Please note that:

-LIBRI(genitive singular of the masculine noun LIBER, 2nd.declension)= of the book

-SEMPER (adverb) = always

-VIRESCIT (3rd.person singular, present indicative of VIRESCO, inchoative verb of VIREO) = flourishes/grows/ becomes greater

-AMOR (subject in the nominative case, masculine noun, 3rd.declension)= love

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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