You are here:

Latin/Latin to English translation

Advertisement


Question
QUESTION: Hello Maria,

My grandma used to pray in Latin and had written some of them in her very old notebook. I came up reading some of it and found the following Latin phrase: "Bonum certanem certavi corsum, consum mavi fidem servavi saulos, qui et paulos magnus praedicator, a deo comfortatus cumvales sebat, et fun debat in da eus deus meus da medem comforta mei."

Am not sure if she spelled them right but if you can help me translate what it is and perhaps correct (if there are erroneous Latin words in the phrase), I will be very happy for I've been so very curious what this Latin phrase exactly means.

Thank you and more power to your expertise.

Sincerely,
Lena

ANSWER: Hello,

the Latin phrase that you wrote is not spelled right as its correct writing would be as follows:
"Bonum certamen certavi, cursum consummavi, fidem servavi. Saulus, qui et Paulus, magnus praedicator, a Deo confortatus, convalescebat, et confundebat Judaeos” meaning:”I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith. Saul, who also is called Paul, a great preacher,  being encouraged  by God, increased much more in strength, and confounded the Jews ....”

As for the last words that your grandma has written, i.e.: “in da eus deus meus da medem comforta mei", they are absolutely wrong in Latin and maybe could sound as follows:”Deus meus, me conforta” meaning “O my God, confort me!”.

So,  the  entire correct prayer should sound as follows:
"Bonum certamen certavi , cursum consummavi, fidem servavi. Saulus, qui et Paulus,  magnus praedicator, a Deo confortatus,  convalescebat, et confundebat Judaeos. Deus meus, me conforta!”
[“I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith. Saul, who also is called Paul, a great preacher, being encouraged   by God, increased much more in strength, and confounded the Jews. O my God, confort me!”.

To conclude, such a prayer is from a Gregorian chant (Latin ecclesiastical chant) written  to celebrate  the Conversion of Saint Paul. So, I think that your grandma knew such a chant and liked it.

Hope this can be helpful to you.

Best regards,

Maria


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Hi Maria,

Just one more question. Is this Latin phrase correct? "Hobe Domine benedeccera noctem qui etam et penem perfectum." Are these latin words spelled correctly. What is this latin phrase exactly mean? It is again found on my Grandma's very old notebook. Thanks again.

Best,
Lena

Answer
Hello,

“Iube, Domine, benedicere. Noctem quietam et finem perfectum concedat nobis  
Dominus omnipotens” are the correct words of this Latin prayer meaning:

“Grant, Lord, a blessing. May almighty God give us a quiet night and a perfect end".

Such words are the beginning of the Compline, i.e. a service of prayers and psalms read after dinner and following Vespers, as the final church service of the day in the daily liturgical cycle, prior to going to sleep.

Best regards,

Maria

Latin

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Maria

Expertise

I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

Experience

Over 25 years teaching experience.

Education/Credentials
I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

This expert accepts donations:

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.