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Latin/Sic and Sicut

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Question
Pax!
What is the difference between sic and sicut?

Answer
The basic difference is that, in most uses, "sic" is an adverb (modifying an adjective, adverb, or verb) and "sicut" is a conjunction (initiating a subordinate clause containing a verb).

Examples of "sic" as an adverb:
  1) Caesar sic dixit.  Caesar spoke thus.
  2) Mare sic altum erat ut Caesar submergeretur.  The sea was so deep that Caesar drowned.

Examples of "sicut" as a subordinating conjunction:
  1) Ars longa est, sicut poeta dixit.  Art is long, as the poet said.
  2) Ille nunc est sicut eram.  That man is now as I used to be.
  3) Vita brevis est, sicut apud nos [est].  Life is sort, as [it is] among us.

  Sometimes "sicut" is used elliptically, that is, with the verb not expressed, but
  implied, as in example 3 above.

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Michael

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Ph.D. Cand. in Classical Languages. Conversant with all forms of the language: classical, mediaeval, and modern.

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I have 50 years of teaching at all levels of Latin from high school through university postgraduate. I read, write, and speak Latin daily.

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American Classical League, American Philological Association

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A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Cand. in Classics.

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