Latin/grammar

Advertisement


Question
Dear Maria,
Could you please help me with the following (all from de Senectute)

(1)“Quarta restat causa, quae maxime angere atque sollicitam habere nostram aetatem videtur”(66)
(a)Is “videtur” [seems to] followed by two verbs: “angere” and “habere”? Is “nostrum aetatem” the object of both verbs: angere” and “habere” or just the verb “habere”? Is there any way to tell grammartically?
(b)Could you give a literal translation of the phrase “sollicitam habere nostram aetatem”? Does the attributive perfect participle “sollicitam” modify “aetatem”, meaning “have my life troubled”?

(2)"tantum remanet, quod virtute et recte factis consecutus sis” (69)
I guess “recte” is an attributive p.p. to modify “factis”. But why not “rectis” to match “factis”, which is a neuter pl. abl.?

(3)“…flammae vis …”(71)
Is the following understanding of mine correct: “vis” is the subj. and “flammae” is gen. as an adj., modifyling “vis”, and therefore it means “the power of flame” although this is different from  Falconer’s translation “a strong flame”.  

(4) “Anne censes, ut de me ipse aliquid more senum glorier, me tantos labores diurnos nocturnosque domi militiaeque suscepturum fuisse, si eisdem finibus gloriam meam, quibus vitam, essem terminaturus?” (82)
Is “gloriam meam” (acc.) the subject in the “si” clause? Is the “si” clause also an acc. + infinitive structure?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1)With regard to “Quarta restat causa, quae maxime angere atque sollicitam habere nostram aetatem videtur”(Cicero, De Senectute, 66) please note that:

(a) “videtur” is  followed by the two verbs “angere” and “habere”, while  “nostram aetatem” is  the object of the verb “habere”.
In short, the verb VIDETUR governs either ANGERE or HABERE which has a direct object  (AETATEM) +  the possessive  adjective (NOSTRAM)  and the predicate adjective (SOLLICITAM) in the feminine accusative agreed with AETATEM.
Note that SOLLICITAM   is not  an attributive perfect participle, but an adjective (see SOLLICITUS.A.UM)  that modifies  “aetatem”.

(b)Here’s the literal translation of “Quarta restat causa, quae maxime angere atque sollicitam habere nostram aetatem videtur”:
”The fourth (QUARTA) reason (CAUSA) remains (RESTAT), that (QUAE) especially (MAXIME) seems  (VIDETUR) to torment (ANGERE)  and (ATQUE) keep/have (HABERE) our (NOSTRAM) age (AETATEM) agitated/troubled (SOLLICITAM)”, i.e. “It remains to consider the fourth reason that seems to especially distress our age and keep it anxious/troubled”.


(2)In "tantum remanet, quod virtute et recte factis consecutus sis” (69)  “recte” is an ADVERB, not an attributive p.p. It modifies  the ablative plural “factis”. As an adverb, RECTE cannot be modified , of course.
So “tantum remanet, quod virtute et recte factis consecutus sis” literally means:
”It remains (REMANET) only (TANTUM. Adverb) what (QUOD) you did (CONSECUTUS SIS) with virtue (VIRTUTE.Instrumental ablative) and (ET)  well–done (RECTE.Adverb) deeds / achievements (FACTIS)”, i.e. :
“It remains only what you have reached  with your  good and virtuous deeds”.



(3)In “…flammae vis …”(71) the word  “vis” is the nominative of the irregular feminine  noun VIS (force/power), while  “flammae” is the genitive  depending on “vis”  and therefore “flammae vis”  means “the power/force  of flame”, although this is different from  Falconer’s translation “a strong flame”, as Falconer’s translation is almost often  a free rendering of the Latin text.


(4)In “Anne censes, ut de me ipse aliquid more senum glorier, me tantos labores diurnos nocturnosque domi militiaeque suscepturum fuisse, si eisdem finibus gloriam meam, quibus vitam, essem terminaturus?” (82) the accusative  “gloriam meam”  is the direct object of the active periphrastic “essem terminaturus”   in the “si” clause whose  subject is EGO implied in ESSEM TERMINATURUS which is the verb of the protasis (‘si’ clause) whose apodosis is ME ...SUSCEPTURUM FUISSSE depending on the main clause ANNE CENSES.

Please note that conditional sentences in Indirect Discourse have the Protasis -which is  a subordinate clause with SI- in the Subjunctive, while the Apodosis is always in some form of the Infinitive.

In short, note that:
-CENSES is the main clause.
-ME ...SUSCEPTURUM FUISSSE is the apodosis of the conditional sentence (si clause) in Indirect Discourse and thus it is in the infinitive + the accusative.
-SI....  [EGO] ESSEM TERMINATURUS is the protasis of the conditional sentence  in Indirect Discourse and thus it is in the subjunctive.
[See AG 589 for  Conditional sentences in Indirect Discourse].

Here’s the literal translation:
” Or ( ANNE, pleonastic  for AN, interrogative conjunction), so that  (UT) I  boast (GLORIER) somewhat (ALIQUID)  of myself (DE ME) after the manner (MORE) of the old (SENUM) , do you think (CENSES) that I (ME) will have undertaken (SUSCEPTURUM FUISSE) such heavy (TANTOS) daytime  (DIURNOS) and night time (NOCTURNOS) labours (LABORES)  at home (DOMI)  and abroad (MILITIAEQUE), if I was (ESSEM) about  to finish ( TERMINATURUS) my (MEAM) fame (GLORIAM) within the same (EISDEM) limits (FINIBUS) within which (QUIBUS) [I was about to finish my] life (VITAM)?”, i.e. :
“Or, to boast somewhat of myself after the manner of the old, do you think that I should have undertaken such heavy labours by day and by night, at home and abroad, if I had believed that the term of my earthly life would mark the limits of my fame”, according to Falconer’s translation.

Hope this is clear enough.

Best regards,

Maria

Latin

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Maria

Expertise

I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

Experience

Over 25 years teaching experience.

Education/Credentials
I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

This expert accepts donations:

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.