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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de senectute).
(1)“isque ad exiguum tempus” (74)
Is “est” understood after “is”? Does “ad” mean “for” although I cannot find that meaning in the dictionary.
(2)“sine qua meditatione tranquillo animo esse nemo potest” (74)
What kind of abl. is “tranquillo animo”? abl. of quality?
(3)“qui morte luit collegae in Cannensi ignominia temeritatem”(75)
Is “ignominia temeritatem” abl. of cause? Why “temeritatem” not in gen. to modify “ignominia”?
(4)“Sunt pueritiae studia certa; ... Sunt ineuntis adulescentiae: ... Sunt etiam eius aetatis; ... Sunt extrema quaedam studia senectutis:” (76)
I just want to make sure that my understanding of these sentences is correct: “studia certa” is understood in the 2nd and 3rd sentences. Furthermore, “pueritiae” is dative [for childhood], whereas “ineuntis adulescentiae”, “eius aetatis” and “senectutis” are all genitives, modifying implied “studia certa” or “studia” in the last sentence.
         
Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

(1)In “isque ad exiguum tempus” (Cicero, De Senectute, 74) the verb  “est” is not understood after “is”, since “isque ad exiguum tempus” means “and (-QUE) this  (IS. Referring to the previous subject noun “sensus”) for (AD) a short (EXIGUUM) time (TEMPUS)”.
As you can see, in this context the preposition “ad” means just  “for”  [Lewis & Short, E,4,c,at: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=ad&la=la&can=ad0&prior=isque&d=Perse  ].
Cato, in fact, is saying that old men can have a certain perception of dying, but for a short time, i.e.  as a fleeting sensation.


(2)In “sine qua meditatione tranquillo animo esse nemo potest” (74) “tranquillo animo” is an  abl. of quality, as you say.
See also “bono animo esse” corresponding  “to be of a tranquil  mind”[AG 415].


(3)In “qui morte luit collegae in Cannensi ignominia temeritatem”(75) the ablative  “ignominia” goes with “in Cannensi” and thus is an Abl.of Place Where, meaning “in  Cannensian dishonour “ referring to the shameful rout at Cannae in 216 BC.
As for  the accusative “temeritatem”, it is the direct object of the verb “luit” meaning “expiated”  in “who (QUI) expiated (luit.Perfect tense) by his death (MORTE.Ablative of Instrument) colleague's (COLLEGAE)  folly/ temerity (TEMERITATEM)”.



(4)In “Sunt pueritiae studia certa; ... Sunt ineuntis adulescentiae: ... Sunt etiam eius aetatis; ... Sunt extrema quaedam studia senectutis:” (76) “studia certa” is  understood in the 2nd and 3rd sentences.
As for  “pueritiae”, it is a genitive singular (=of childhood)  just like  “ineuntis adulescentiae”, “eius aetatis” and “senectutis” are all genitives,  referring to the implied “studia certa”, whereas in the last sentence “... Sunt extrema quaedam studia senectutis “ the subject “studia” accompanied by the adjectives “extrema quaedam”  is not implied, as you can see.
In short,here's the literal translation:

“Certain (CERTA) desires (STUDIA) are typical (SUNT) of boyhood.... Certain (CERTA) desires (STUDIA) are typical (SUNT) of early youth... Certain (CERTA) desires (STUDIA) are typical (SUNT) of the that (EIUS)  age (AETATIS, i.e. the maturity) ... Some (Quaedam) last (EXTREMA) desires (STUDIA) are typical (SUNT) of old age..”.

Please go to AG 343 where you can know something about the Possessive Genitive that "denotes the person or thing to which an object, quality, feeling, or action belongs", as you can see at paragraph c, phrase 6 (Sapientis est pauca loqui"= "it is wise [it is typical/ it is the part of a wise man] to say little").

Hope all is clear enough.

All the best,

Maria

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