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Latin/Latin Phrase

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Question
I'm looking for a phrase that will mean, in Latin, "Born for death". I've these two elsewhere on the internet and wondered if their meanings are, in fact, correct:
MORTI NATVS SVM - "I was born for death",
MORTI NATVS ES - "Born for death".

I have also read that Seneca used "MORTI NATVS ES" to mean "born for death", although I am not sure as to the context in which it was used (if you know that might be helpful, although not at all necessary).

It should be noted I am not asking this for a tattoo - I am very much against them - but simply as an side-interest in my current fixation with Roman Philosophers and, in particular, Stoicism.

Thank you very much and I look forward to hearing from you!

Answer
Hello,

in Seneca, De tranquillitate animi (On Tranquillity of the Soul), I.14 we read the sentence “Morti natus es”, literally meaning:”You were born for death”.  
This is a phrase that Serenus, a  disciple and  friend of the Roman philosopher and tragedian Seneca (born c. 4 BC— died 65 AD), is addressing  to himself, just to point out  that life is short.

Therefore he is using the verb NATUS ES (= you were born) which is  the 2nd.person singular, past indicative of the deponent verb NASCI meaning “to be born”.

In short, “Morti natus es” does not mean “Born for death” in general, but “You are born for death” in particular, where the pronoun “you” is a 2nd.person singular, not a 2nd.person plural, though in English the pronoun "you" can refer to either the 2nd.person singular or the 2nd.person plural.

Please note that:

-“Morti natus sum” (in the 1st.masculine singular person ) means “I was born for death” related to a male person, while “Morti nata sum” (in the 1st.feminine singular person ) means “I was born for death” related to a female person.

-“Morti natus es” ( in the 2nd.masculine singular person) means “You were born for death” related to a male person, while “Morti nata es ” (in the 2nd. feminine singular person) means “You were  born for death” related to a female person.

-“Morti natus est” (in the 3rd.masculine singular person) means “He was born for death” related to a male person, while “Morti nata est” (in the 3rd. feminine singular person) means “She was born for death” related to a female person.

-“Morti nati sumus” (in the 1st.masculine plural person) means “We were born for death” related to  male persons, while “Morti natae sumus” (in the  1st.feminine plural person)  means “We were born for death” related to female persons.

-“Morti nati estis (in the 2nd.masculine plural person ) means “You were born for death” related to  male persons, while “Morti natae estis ” (in the 2nd. feminine plural person)  means “You were born for death” related to  female persons.

-“Morti nati sunt” (in the 3rd.masculine plural person ) means “They were born for death” related to  male persons, while “Morti natae sunt” (in the 3rd.feminine plural person)  means “They  were born for death” related to  female persons.

To sum up, if you want to say “Born for death”, you must use one of the above-mentioned phrases, according to the person you are referring to, since Latin is an inflected language, differently from English.

Hope this is clear enough.Feel free however to ask me again.

Best regards,

Maria
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Note that:

-MORTI (dative singular of MORS, 3rd.declension) = for death

-NATVS ES (2nd.person singular, past tense, indicative mood of the deponent verb NASCI)= you were born (related to only one person, not to many persons)

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Maria

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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