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Latin/Proper grammar for motto

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Question
Dear Maria,

Our organization just adopted the motto, "Committed to Excellence." The logo displays the Latin phrase, "Commissa Excellentia." Is this correct? I have seen other translations.

Thank you,
Erin

Answer
Hello,

the phrase “Committed to Excellence” as a motto for  an organisation looking to excel  must be translated correctly as: “Excellentiae dediti”, literally meaning ”Committed/devoted to excellence”.

Please note that :

-EXCELLENTIAE (dative singular of  the noun “excellentia”, 1st.declension) = to excellence

-DEDITI (nominative masculine plural of DEDITUS agreed with an implied subject)= committed.
Latin grammar uses this nominative masculine plural as it refers in general to the members (male & female persons)  of such an organisation.

As for “Commissa Excellentia”, I’m sorry, but it is absolutely wrong for it would mean “An excellence having been committed”(if it is an ablative absolute with the long vowel ā) as well as “A committed excellence” (if it is in the nominative case with the short vowel ă).
Anyway, both the translations would make no sense at all, as you can see.

Hope this is clear enough. Feel free however to ask me again.
Best regards,
Maria  

Latin

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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