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Question
Hi

re the below emal:

Both statements are to be used as a command to the 'many' not a single person. The context and purpose of the statement is purely ' motivational' to a group

regards

Richard





Your Question was:

Hi I am looking for the following sayings in Latin "believe in ones inner strength" or "believe in your inner strength" thanks

Following is the reason:

Hello,

Tell me please the purpose and context where you want to put  the sentence “Believe in your inner strength".
Also, is “Believe in your inner strength" a command/exhortation  addressed to only one person or to many persons?
You must specify this, because Latin has 2 different forms for the 2nd.person singular and the 2nd.person plural of the imperative mood, while English uses only one form such as “Believe”/” Trust”/ “Go”, etc.

Answer
Hello,

thanks for explaining your thought.
So, “Believe in your inner strength", just as a command addressed to many persons, can be translated as follows:

-“Vestrae credite fortitudini”
or:
-“Vestrae confidite fortitudini” as well as “Vestra confidite fortitudine”.
[See parsing below ]

All the above sentences are correct, of course, and then you can choose the one you like best.

As for “Believe in one’s inner strength", it can be translated as follows:

-“Cuiuspiam  credite fortitudini”
or:
-“Cuiuspiam  confidite fortitudini” as well as “Cuiuspiam confidite fortitudine”.
[See parsing below ]

All the above sentences are correct, of course, and then you can choose the one you like best.

Best regards,
Maria
________________________________________________________________________
Note that in “Believe in your inner strength”:

-Believe  = CREDITE (2nd.person plural, present imperative of CREDO, I believe) or CONFIDITE (2nd.person plural, present imperative of CONFIDO, I believe/trust).
The verb CREDO takes the dative case, while the verb CONFIDO can take both dative and ablative case.

-in your = VESTRAE (dative case of the 2nd.person plural adjective VESTER agreed with the feminine Dative FORTITUDINI)  or VESTRA (ablative case of the 2nd.person plural adjective VESTER agreed with the feminine ablative FORTITUDINE)

-inner strength = FORTITUDINI (dative  singular of the feminine noun FORTITUDO, 3rd.declension) or FORTITUDINE (ablative singular of the feminine noun FORTITUDO, 3rd.declension).
The noun FORTITUDO (nominative case) means exactly “inner strength”.


Note that in “Believe in in one’s inner strength”:

-Believe = CREDITE (2nd.person plural, present imperative of CREDO, I believe) or CONFIDITE (2nd.person plural, present imperative of CONFIDO, I believe/trust).
The verb CREDO takes the dative case, while the verb CONFIDO can take both dative and ablative case.

-in one’s = CUIUSPIAM (genitive singular of the pronoun QUISPIAM)

-inner strength == FORTITUDINI (dative  singular of the feminine noun FORTITUDO, 3rd.declension) or FORTITUDINE (ablative singular of the feminine noun FORTITUDO, 3rd.declension).
The noun FORTITUDO (nominative case) means exactly “inner strength”.


As you can see, Latin  word order can be variable and often depends on writing style of an author. Latin is in fact an inflected language where  syntactical relationships are indicated by the ending, not by the order of words.

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