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Hello dear Lady Maria. I hope you would be very well.
I am reading a paper on Art, and there is an old word in your language (may be)on it. Any how I could not find its meaning in different dictionaries. Well, that word is Navile. The paper talks about the Renaissance artist who were interested in proportion of architecture and of human beings. It seems navile is something somewhere in our throat! I should emphasize that I do not expect you answering my question. It is just the last attempt in finding a word s meaning. Really Thanks.

Answer
Hello,

although your question has nothing to do with Latin, I want to satisfy your curiosity about the word “navile” that you have read in Richard Haydocke’s translation of  an Italian  treatise on art by Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo,an Italian painter and writer who lived in the 16th century.

This word is nothing but the old form for  “navel”, clinically known as the umbilicus, colloquially known as the belly button or umbilical dip, which is a scar / a prominent mark on the abdomen, with its position being relatively consistent amongst humans.

In fact the  phrase “The circumference of the neck is as much as from the throat-pit to the navile....” that you have seen in Richard Haydocke’s translation is just the translation of the Italian text by Lomazzo:” quanto è dalla fontanella all’umbelico,tanto è il circuito del collo...”(“ Trattato dell'arte della pittura, scoltura et architettura “, page 41).

So,  the Renaissance artist who were interested in proportion of architecture and of human beings   is just the Italian painter and writer Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo  (born  Milano, 1538 - died  Milano,  1600) who wrote a treatise on art called “Trattato dell'arte della pittura, scoltura et architettura”, Milano, 1584 , divided into seven books, whose themes are Proportion, Motion, Colour, Light, Perspective, Practice, and History .

Such a treatise was translated into English  by the Oxford physician Richard Haydocke  in 1598,  and was entitled “ A Tracte Containing the Artes of Curious Paintinge, Carvinge & Buildinge”.

It is just in this English translation, page 34, that we read :”The measures which are unisone and equally between themselves are these. First the space between the chin and the throat-pit is as much as the diameter of the neck. The circumference of the neck is as much as from the throat-pit to the navile....”, as it is said in a note written in 1757 by Edmund Burke in his "Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful” (note 2, page 259-260) .

To sum up, the old English term “navile”, meaning ”navel”, is not something  that is in our throat,as you say, but refers to the distance from the throat  to the belly button.

Hope I’ve helped you.

Best regards,
Maria
___________________________________________________________________
See Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo, “Trattato dell'arte della pittura, scoltura et architettura”, page 41 at:
http://books.google.it/books?id=woLXoLDqh1sC&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22

See Edmund Burke in “A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful” (note 2, page 259-260),page 259-260 at:
http://books.google.it/books?id=qQDLloXrxSgC&pg=PA260&lpg=PA260&dq=navile+.throa  

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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