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Hello Maria,

would you please translate the following for me? I’m sorry it’s so much... your help would be greatly appreciated!

“Ex natura belli, commercia inter hostes cessore non est dubitandum. Quamvis nulla specialis sit commerciorum prohibitio, ipso tamen jure belli commercia esse vetita, ipsae indictiones bellonrum satis declarant.”

and

“Quamvis nulla specialis sit commerciorum prohibitio, ipso tamen jure belli commercia esse vetita, ipsae indictiones bellonrum satis declarant.”

These are excerpts from a book on the history of international economic relations, specifically trading-with-the-enemy legislation.

Thank you so very much!
Sincerely,
Sonja

Answer
Hello,

Here's the translation of the passage “Ex natura belli, commercia inter hostes cessare non est dubitandum. Quamvis nulla specialis sit commerciorum prohibitio, ipso tamen jure belli commercia esse vetita, ipsae indictiones bellorum satis declarant”, that is a quotation from Cornelis van Bynkershoek, "Quaestionum Juris publici libri duo" (also cited as QJP, meaning “Questions of Public Law: Two Books“), book 1, chapter 3:

“Because of the nature of war, it is beyond doubt that all commercial intercourse between enemies must be suspended. Even though there is no special prohibition to trade, the mere declaration of war  states sufficiently that commercial intercourse are not permitted just because of  the law of war”.

Please note that Cornelis van Bynkershoek (born 1673-died 1743) was a Dutch jurist and scholar as well  as an authority on maritime and commercial law.
He was the author of works on special problems of international law, including “De dominio maris dissertatio” (Dissertation on the Dominion of the Sea)(1702) and "Quaestionum Juris publici libri duo" (Questions of Public Law: Two Books“(1737).

Van Bynkershoek wrote his works in Latin simply because Latin was then the “lingua franca”, that is to say a medium of communication between peoples of different languages, just like English today.


Lastly I have to point out that  the second passage you mention, i.e. “Quamvis nulla specialis sit commerciorum prohibitio, ipso tamen jure belli commercia esse vetita, ipsae indictiones bellorum satis declarant” is nothing but a part of  the first passage “Ex natura belli, commercia inter hostes cessare non est dubitandum. Quamvis nulla specialis sit commerciorum prohibitio, ipso tamen jure belli commercia esse vetita, ipsae indictiones bellorum satis declarant”, as you can see.


Hope this can be helpful to you.

Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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