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Question
Good morning,
i would like to translate this sentence into classic latin to engraved it on a proposal ring :

"The best is yet to come"

Thank you for your time!

Kind regards.

Answer
Hello,

“The best is yet to come” could be  translated correctly as follows:

-“Meliora  venient tempora ” (literally, “Better times will come”), if you want to make a comparison between two things, i.e. “present “ and “future” in the sense that the present is good, but the future will be better.

or:

-“Meliora nobis Fata tempora parant” (literally, “Fate prepares  better times for us”), if you want to say that destiny prepares a future  that will be better than the present.

If on the contrary you are looking for a literal translation, I have to tell you that it is not possible in Latin where the closest version could be the following:

-”Nondum advenit optimum “ (literally, “The best has not yet  arrived”) where I’ve used the superlative  neuter “optimum” (the best)as  to say that the best thing of all has not yet arrived.

Hope all is clear enough. Feel free however to ask me again.

Best regards,
Maria
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Note that in "Meliora  venient tempora"(“Better times will come”):

-MELIORA (superlative of BONUS, nominative neuter agreed with TEMPORA)= better

-VENIENT (3rd.person plural, future of VENIO) = will come

-TEMPORA (subject, nominative neuter plural of TEMPUS, 3rd.declension)=times

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In "Meliora nobis Fata tempora parant"(“Fate prepares  better times for us"):

-MELIORA (superlative of BONUS, accusative neuter agreed with TEMPORA)= better

-NOBIS (dative plural of the pronoun NOS)= for us

-FATA (subject, nominative plural of the neuter noun FATUM ,2nd.declension)= fate/destiny. Note that Latin prefers to use the plural.

-TEMPORA(direct object,accusative neuter plural of TEMPUS, 3rd.declension)= times

-PARANT (3rd.person plural,present indicative of PARO) = prepares

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In "Nondum advenit optimum “ (literally, “The best has not yet  arrived”):

-NONDUM (adverb)= not yet

-ADVENIT(3rd.person singular, past tense/perfect tense of ADVENIO) = has arrived

-OPTIMUM (subject in the nominative neuter singular, superlative of BONUS) = the best thing of all

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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