Latin/grammar

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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de Officiis)

1. si aliquando alio domino solita est frequentari (139)
Is “aliquando alio domino” abl. abs.?

2. ne extra modum sumptu et magnificentia prodeas (140)
Does “extra modum” go with “prodeas”? and “prodeas extra modum” literally means “go beyond boundary”? And “sumptu et magnificentia” is abl of aspect?

3. Haec autem scientia continentur ea (142)
My understanding: “haec” is subj, and “ea" goes with "scientia”,  meaning “that science”. Is that correct? Is the Latin for “A is contained in B” “A continetur B”? That is, you don’t need a prop. Such as “in” after “continetur”?

4. Sic fit, ut modestia haec, quam ita interpretamur, ut dixi, scientia sit opportunitatis idoneorum ad agendum temporum.(142)
Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you,
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “….si aliquando alio domino solita est frequentari (Cicero,De Officiis,I,139)“aliquando” is an adverb of time meaning “once”/”at some other time”, while  “alio domino” is an  ablative absolute where the obsolete/wanting present participle of "esse" is understood, so that “alio domino” literally means :”another (alio) owner (domino) being ”, i.e. “..when there was another owner…” with reference to a house which was much frequented once when there was a different owner.

2.In “…. ne extra modum sumptu et magnificentia prodeas…” (I, 140) “extra modum” goes with “prodeas” and “prodire extra modum” literally means “to go beyond the bound” understood as “reasonable bounds”.
As for “sumptu et magnificentia”, they are  ablatives of Specification/Respect  (ablativus limitationis)  as they denote the respect in which something is true.
In short,  the ablative of Specification, aka of Respect, is used to answer the question: "with respect to what?".


3.In “… Haec autem scientia continentur ea…” (I,142) it is correct to say that the nominative neuter plural  “haec” (these things/qualities) is the subject, and the ablative feminine singular “ea"(that) goes with the ablative "scientiā”(science), so that "Haec autem scientia continentur ea" means “These things/ qualities are contained in that science....”.
Note that the passive of the verb “contineo” usually takes the ablative without preposition, while rarely it takes “in” with  the ablative.


4. Here’s the literal translation for “Sic fit, ut modestia haec, quam ita interpretamur, ut dixi, scientia sit opportunitatis idoneorum ad agendum temporum”(I, 142):
”So (sic)it happens (fit) that (ut) this (haec) moderation (modestia) which (quam) we interpret (interpretamur) just in this manner (ita) as (ut) I have said(dixi), is (sit) the science (scientia) of the favorable opportunity (opportunitatis) of times (temporum) fit (idoneorum) for doing (ad agendum, gerund accusative with ‘ad’)”, with reference to moderation understood as the ability to know and choose the right time to do something.


Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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