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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de Officiis)

1. ut cum admiratione hominum honore ab iis digni iudicaremur (II. 36)
Is “digni” followed by both “admiratione” and “honore”? If so, what does “cum” mean?

2. quod in quo viro perspectum sit (II. 38)
Could you explain this?

3. in primisque, ut habeat, quibuscum possit familiares conferre sermons (II. 39)
Is “eos” understood after “habeat”?

4. Nam qui eorum cuipiam, qui una latrocinantur, furatur aliquid aut eripit, (II. 40)
Why f. “una”? Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you,
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “Erat …ex iis tribus, quae ad gloriam pertinerent, hoc tertium, ut cum admiratione hominum honore ab iis digni iudicaremur…” (Cicero, De Officiis, II. 36) the adjective  “digni” is followed by the ablative “honore”, while  “cum” in “cum admiratione”  is the preposition that forms a kind of ablative of company as “cum admiratione”  literally means “together with admiration”.
So, “Erat … ex iis tribus, quae ad gloriam pertinerent, hoc tertium, ut cum admiratione hominum honore ab iis digni iudicaremur…” literally means:”  Of the three things/conditions (ex iis tribus) that would be  essential (quae pertinerent) to glory (ad gloriam) the third thing (tertium)  was (erat) this thing (hoc), that (ut) together with admiration of men (hominum) we are considered worthy of esteem (honore)”, i.e. " Of the three conditions that are  essential to glory (ad gloriam) this was the third condition, that together with admiration of men we are considered worthy of esteem"


2. The relative clause “…. quod in quo viro perspectum sit …” (II. 38)- which refers to the previous sentence “Maximeque admirantur eum, qui pecunia non movetur”( And people admire especially the man who is uninfluenced by money)“- literally means:” which thing/behaviour  (quod) may be seen (perspectum sit) in that man in whom (in quo viro)… “.
In short, “…….quod in quo viro perspectum sit, hunc igni spectatum arbitrantur” literally means:” in that man in whom (in quo viro) this thing/behaviour  (quod) may be seen (perspectum sit)), they think (arbitrantur) that this man (hunc, subject of the object-clause) has been tested ( spectatum[esse], past infinitive, passive voice, of “specto”) by fire (igni)”.

Therefore  “Maximeque admirantur eum, qui pecunia non movetur; quod in quo viro perspectum sit, hunc igni spectatum arbitrantur” means:” And people admire especially the man who is uninfluenced by money so that people think that such a  man, in whom this behaviour may be seen, has stood the test of fire”



3.In “…..in primisque, ut habeat, quibuscum possit familiares conferre sermones…” (II. 39) the plural accusative “eos”  is  understood after “habeat” preceding the relative “quibuscum” (“cum” in anastrophe,i.e. “cum quibus” =”with whom”) which has  the antecedent “eos” understood.
So, “…ut habeat, quibuscum possit …” means:”---in order that one may have some friends with whom…”.



4. In “Nam qui eorum cuipiam, qui una latrocinantur, furatur aliquid aut eripit, …” (II. 40) “unā” is an adverbial expression meaning “together” so that “qui una latrocinantur” literally means “who (qui) are robbing (latrocinantur) together (unā)”.

Here’s the literal translation for “Nam qui eorum cuipiam, qui una latrocinantur, furatur aliquid aut eripit,…”: “In fact(enim) who (qui) steals (furatur) or takes away (aut eripit)  something (aliquid) from somebody (cuipiam) of those (eorum) who (qui) are robbing (latrocinantur) together (unā) [with him]…”.

It seems that the adverbial expression "unā" originally implied the feminine ablative "viā" just to mean "in one and the same way" and then, as an adverb without "viā",  "together", "at the same time".

Best regards,

Maria

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