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Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de Officiis)

1.Quae autem in multitudine cum contentione habetur oratio, ea saepe universam excitat [gloriam]; magna est enim admiratio copiose sapienterque dicentis; (II. 48)
(a)In the first part of the sentence, can “oratio: be placed after “eo”, meaning “that speech”, and “eo oratio” is modified by the relative clause “Quae autem in multitudine cum contentione habetur”? If so, why did Cicero put “oratio” inside the relative clause?
(b)Is “magna est enim admiratio copiose sapienterque dicentis” double dative structure: “magna admiration” and “copiose sapienterque dicentis”?

2. Sin erit, cui faciendum sit saepius, rei publicae tribuat hoc muneris (II. 50)
Could you give a literal translation of this sentence? Why gen. “muneris”?

3. Nec tamen, ut hoc fugiendum est, item est habendum religioni nocentem aliquando, (II. 51)
Why dat. “religioni”?

4. Iudicis est semper in causis verum sequi, patroni non numquam veri simile (II.51)
Is “veri simile” used as a noun here?

Thank you,
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.Note that in “Quae autem in multitudine cum contentione habetur oratio, ea saepe universam excitat gloriam; magna est enim admiratio copiose sapienterque dicentis..” (Cicero, De Officiis, II. 48):
(a)in the first part of the sentence, “oratio” must not be placed after “ea” (nominative feminine referring to “oratio”), since Cicero has put “oratio” inside the relative clause “Quae…oratio…” simply because the feminine  pronoun “ea”, related to the preceding relative “Quae…oratio..”,  is employed for emphasis so that “QUAE … in multitudine cum contentione habetur ORATIO, EA saepe universam excitat gloriam ..” literally means:
”THAT FORMAL SPEECH (quae …cum contentione..…oratio) is delivered (habetur) in public/before a large audience (in multitudine),THIS (ea) [oratio= speech/oratory] often (saepe) stimulates (excitat) an universal (universam) praise (gloriam)..”.

In short, “QUAE … ORATIO, EA..” is a commonly used idiomatic construction where  is, ea, id which must  stand in the same case with the preceding relative pronoun /adjective,  is employed for emphasis.
Such a construction is  often used in Latin, as I've already said in some of my previous answers to your questions.

(b) “magna est enim admiratio copiose sapienterque dicentis” is not at all a double dative structure since  there is no dative here.
In fact,   “magna… admiratio” is a nominative feminine;  “copiose sapienterque” are two adverbs” and “ dicentis” is the genitive singular of the present participle of “dico”.

So, “magna est enim admiratio copiose sapienterque dicentis” literally means:” for (enim) there is (est) a great (magna) admiration (admiratio)  for /of  the one who is speakingg (dicentis) eloquently (copiose) and wisely (sapienterque)”.



2. Here’s the literal translation for “Sin erit, cui faciendum sit saepius, rei publicae tribuat hoc muneris “(II. 50):
“But if /If however (sin) it ( i.e.”prosecution” , see “accusatio” at the end of the previous chapter 49)  will to be done /must be done (erit …faciendum, second periphrastic) quite often (saepius) by somebody (cui,i.e. “alicui”,  dative of the Agent used with the Gerundive to denote the person on whom the necessity rests),  let him to do (tribuat, hortatory subjunctive) it (hoc, i.e. “prosecution”) as a service (muneris, genitive partitive depending on “hoc”) to  [his] state (rei publicae)".
The  genitive  “muneris” is a kind of partitive used in an idiomatic expression such as e.g.“hoc est muneris tui” meaning “it’s thanks to you that…” or “it’s as a service to you…”.



3. In “Nec tamen, ut hoc fugiendum est, item est habendum religioni nocentem aliquando,…. defendere..”(II. 51) the  dat. “religioni” goes with “habendum” as “habere religioni” or “habere aliquid religioni” means:”to have something as a scruple of conscience”.

Note that this dative is used to denote the Purpose or End in an idiomatic expression.



4. In “Iudicis est semper in causis verum sequi, patroni non numquam veri simile..” (II.51) the adjective “veri simile” or “verisimile” (literally, “the plausibile”/what is plausible)  is used as a noun here just in antithesis/connection with the noun  “verum” (the truth).


Best regards,

Maria

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