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Question
Maria,

What would be the difference between “Per adversa fortitudo" and “Adversis in rebus fortis”? You wrote that they mean the same thing in two of your past responses.

ALso,

You had explained:
“Per adversas res fortitudo” points out that it is JUST THROUGH adversity that we can become strong.

Question:  So there is no way to GENERALLY say that THROUGH Adversity, we can become strong? Because this phrase says it is ONLY THROUGH adversity that we can become strong.

(The statement isnt really true, because there are other ways to become strong. It doesnt necessarily have to be from ADVERSITY)

(Sorry, I am getting so confused.)



Question :

==> FORTITUDO pronounced==> "For-thi-TWO-Doe"   


==>is ADVERSIS pronounced==> "Ad-VERSE-is" in English with accent on VERSE?


==>Also,How is ADVERSITATE pronounced?
       


Once Again, I appreciate all of your help.  

Regards,


Jeff

Answer
Hello,

first of all  I have said that “Per adversa fortitudo" and “Adversis in rebus fortitudo” [NOT “Adversis in rebus fortis”  as “fortis” is an adjective, while FORTITUDO is a noun] have approximately  the same meaning because  both  “Per adversa fortitudo" (=Strength through adversities) and “Adversis in rebus fortitudo” (= “Strength IN adversities” as well as “Strong tHROUGH adversities”) point out that it is just THROUGH / IN adversities that one can achieve   strenght in enduring or undertaking hardship.

So, when you say :”So there is no way to GENERALLY say that THROUGH Adversity, we can become strong? Because this phrase says it is ONLY THROUGH adversity that we can become strong” and “The statement isn’t really true, because there are other ways to become strong. It doesnt necessarily have to be from ADVERSITY”, you show your little knowledge of Roman way of thinking, since the Romans thought that it was just THROUGH  or  IN adversities that one can achieve  strenght.
In short, the Romans thought that  men would achieve strenght either THROUGH adversities or IN adversities, for in their opinion the most important words in these sentences were ADVERSA and ADVERSIS REBUS,both meaning “adversities”  that they considered the  true source of strength, independently of the prepositions IN / PER.

As for the pronunciation of some words, note that:

-FORTITUDO is pronounced "For-thi-TWO-DO" (see the O in “on”).

-ADVERSIS is pronounced "Ad-VERS-is" with accent on the first E of -VERSE in English (see the UK pronunciation of “advesrsity” at http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/adversity?q=adversity#)

-In ADVERSITATE  the first part ADVERSIT- is pronounced   ADVERSIT  like in “adversity”, while A in TA is pronounced as the A in “father” and  the final E is pronounced like the first E in the UK pronounciation of “adverse” (http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/adverse?q=adverse#). The accent stands on  the syllable TA.

So, I really think that this matter has been examined in any detail and thus I believe that I have nothing else to tell you about.

Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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