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Latin/Latin Translation

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Question
Maria,


Does it change anything if the phrases are written like the ones below
(for example making a poster/sign)?


Does it have to be on one line? Just wondering, because Latin has a lot of language rules.

1."Fortis esto
  ac persevera"

2."Fortis
  esto semper"




If one wanted to just say "Strength and Perseverence. Do you just use the words alone?
So you'd say==> "Fortitudo ac diligentia"?

Although, I dont think this is correct...


         
Thanks Very Much,

Dave Miller

Answer
Hello,

if the phrases are written like you say, i.e. on two lines instead of on one line, you must not change anything, as no grammatical/ synctatical rule of the Latin language has been modified, but there is only a placement on two lines instead of on one line.

As for "Strength and Perseverance”,you must say “Fortitudo ac perseverantia”,  NOT “Fortitudo ac diligentia” for the Latin noun DILIGENTIA means “carefulness/attentiveness/ diligence”, while the Latin noun PERSEVERANTIA means exactky “perseverance” in the sense of “ continued effort and determination”.

Lastly,  the sentence “Fortitudo ac perseverantia”, composed of two nominative cases, i.e. FORTITUDO (3rd declension) and PERSEVERANTIA (1st declension), linked by the conjunction AC (and), can be used as a motto, for example, and so must be just in the nominative case.

Best regards,

Maria
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P.S.Please note that I've supposed that both sentences "Fortis esto ac persevera" (Be strong and persevere) and "Fortis esto semper" (Be forever strong)are addressed to only one person (2nd.person singular), not to many persons (2nd person plural)  and then I've used the imperatives ESTO / PERSEVERA and the nominative singular FORTIS.

If on the contrary such sentences are addressed to many persons (2nd person plural), you must say:"Fortes estote ac perseverate" and "Fortes estote semper", where FORTES is the nominative plural, while ESTOTE and PERSEVERATE are the 2nd person plural of the imperative of SUM and PERSEVERO respectively.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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