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Latin/Latin phrase from a British coin

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Question
Hello,

I recently found a Latin phrase on a British coin and I have found a couple translations into English, but they don't sound quite right.  I was wondering if the phrase could be translated differently.

The Latin is: Sic oritur doctrina surget que libertas.

Here is the coin:
http://www.coinfacts.com/colonial_coins/franklin_press/franklinpresstoken.htm

Here are the two translations I found:
1. Thus learning begins and liberty arises.
2. Thus learning advances and liberty grows.

Thank you for your time,
Roy

Answer
Hello,

the Latin legend on the Franklin Press token of 1794 "Sic oritur doctrina surgetque libertas“ literally means:

1.”Thus learning is born and liberty  will arise”
or:
2."In this manner knowledge rises  and liberty  will dawn”

(See parsing below).

Therefore between the two translations that you mention the closer one is “Thus learning begins and liberty arises”, while in  “Thus learning advances and liberty grows”  the verbs “advances” and “grows” do not correspond to the true meaning of “oritur”  (is born/rises) and “surget” (will dawn/will arise).

Moreover in both “Thus learning begins and liberty arises “ and “Thus learning advances and liberty grows” there is a mistake because the Latin verb “surget” is not a present indicative, but a future indicative of the verb “surgo” belonging to the 3rd conjugation, whose present indicative would be "surgit", not "surget".

To sum up, "Sic oritur doctrina surgetque libertas “ can be translated correctly as follows:

1.“Thus learning is born and liberty will arise”
or:
2.“Thus knowledge rises and liberty will dawn”.

Best regards,

Maria
_________________________________________________
Note that:

-SIC = thus/in this manner

-ORITUR (3rd person singular, present indicative of the deponent verb ORIOR) = is born/rises

-DOCTRINA (subject in the nominative case, 1st declension) =learning/knowledge

-SURGETQUE (3rd person singular, future of SURGO + the enclitic –QUE attached to the end of the  verb) = and will dawn/will arise

-LIBERTAS (subject in the nominative case, 3rd declension) = liberty

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Maria

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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