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Question
for the term Verum Aeternus (its the name of a song i listen to) I have seen several different translations. I would like to know the exact meaning of these words

Answer
Hello,

Actually  such a song title “Verum Aeternus” is  absolutely wrong as these two Latin words cannot go together as they should agree in gender, according to Latin grammar, and thus they should sound as "Verum Aeternum" (NOT "Aeternus").

In fact,  the noun “Verum” (meaning “truth”)  is in the nominative or accusative  NEUTER singular, whereas the adjective “Aeternus”(“eternal”) , which is in the nominative MASCULINE, should have been agreed with the neuter noun “Verum” and then it should have been “Aeternum” in the NEUTER singular.

In short, “Verum Aeternus” does not make sense  at all in Latin and the  correct form  should  have been  VERUM AETERNUM or  AETERNUM VERUM, both meaning “Eternal Truth”.

Please note that the noun VERUM (nominative or accusative neuter singular, 2nd declension) means “truth”, while AETERNUM (nominative or accusative neuter singular of the adjective AETERNUS agreed with  the noun VERUM) means “eternal”.

Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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