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Latin/Follow-up question

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Dear Maria,
This is a follow-up question:
“una domus erat, idem victus, isque communis” (103)
Does “is” refer to “victus”? If so, it seems that “is communis [erat nobis]” and “idem victus [erat nobis]” have exactly the same meaning.
Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

please note that  in “una domus erat, idem victus, isque communis” (Cicero, De Amicitia, 103) the pronoun “is” refers to “victus” (diet/food), just to emphasize that Laelius and Scipio ate the same food  (idem victus) at the same table (isque communis), so that they were always together.

Therefore  “is communis [erat nobis]” and “idem victus [erat nobis]” do not have exactly the same meaning, for Laelius wants to point out that he himself and Scipio did not eat in different rooms, but in the same room at the same table.
Hence:” “We had only one home, the same diet that we shared in common”.

Hope this is clear enough.

Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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