Latin/Grammar

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Question
Dear Maria,

Please help me understand following sentences. (Ars Amatoria 1)

1.
Ergo erit illa dies, qua tu, pulcherrime rerum, quattuor in niveis aureus ibis equis. (213-214)
- What is 'aureus' connected to? ibis, meaning in golden clothes?

2.
Ibunt ante duces onerati colla catenis, ne possint tuti, qua prius, esse fuga. (215-216)
1) It seems 'onerati colla catenis' is not ablative absolute. Which grammar rule does it belong to in this case?
2) Please explain 'qua prius'.
3) fuga is ablative?


3.
Atque aliqua ex illis cum regum nomina quaeret, quae loca, qui montes, quaeve ferantur aquae, (219-220)

- What's the meaning of 'ferantur'?

4.
Omnia responde, nec tantum siqua rogabit;
Et quae nescieris, ut bene nota refer.

What's the gender, number and case of 'quae' and 'nota'?


With your answer, I have learned the meaning of 'in eo sum ut..' Sorry but please let me know the meaning of 'eo' in the phrase again.

Thank you.

J

Answer
Dear John,


1.In “Ergo erit illa dies, qua tu, pulcherrime rerum, quattuor in niveis aureus ibis equis" (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1, 213-214) the adjective "aureus" is  connected to the subject pronoun  “tu” (2nd person singular).
As for “ibis”, it is the 2nd person singular, future of the verb “eo” , and then it means “you will go by ”, not “in golden clothes” which corresponds to “aureus”.

In short, here’s the literal translation of “Ergo erit illa dies, qua tu, pulcherrime rerum, quattuor in niveis aureus ibis equis”:
”So(ergo) that (illa)  day (dies) will be (erit) in which(qua) you (tu), the most beautiful one(pulcherrime. Vocative masculine+ the genitive plural "rerum", literally, "of all the things") , will proceed (ibis) in golden clothes(aureus), drawn by (in) four (quattuor) snowy (niveis) horses (equis)”, i.e.:
”So one of these days  you, the most beautiful one, will proceed in golden clothes, drawn by  four snowy horses”.




2.In “Ibunt ante duces onerati colla catenis, ne possint tuti, qua prius, esse fuga” (215-216)  "onerati” (weighed down ) is a past participle  (from “onero”) in the nominative masculine plural agreeing with the subject “duces” (the generals);  “catenis' is an ablative depending upon “onerati” and meaning “with chains”, and finally “colla” is the accusative  plural of the neuter noun “collum” (neck).

In short, “onerati colla catenis” means :” necks weighed down with chains” as “colla” is a Greek Accusative that is often used  in poetry to denote the part affected, so that “Ibunt ante duces onerati colla catenis”  means:
” The generals will go before you, being their necks weighed down with chains”.

As for “ne possint tuti, qua prius, esse fuga”, it means:”so that  they cannot (ne....possint) be (esse) sure (tuti) of  their escape (fuga.Ablative depending upon the adjective “tutus”), of which (qua.Relative feminine ablative related to “fuga” and depending upon the implied adjective “tuti”) [they were sure] before (prius)”.



3.In “Atque aliqua ex illis cum regum nomina quaeret, quae loca, qui montes, quaeve ferantur aquae..."(219-220) the meaning of the present subjunctive  "ferantur" in “aliqua ex illis cum ...... quaeret .....quaeve ferantur aquae” is the following:
“when (cum)some [girl] (aliqua) among them (ex illis) asks (quaeret)....or (-ve) what ( quae-ve, where the suffix –ve is an enclitic meaning “or”) rivers (aquae) are carried...,” i.e.:
” when some [girl] among them asks .... or what rivers flow...”.


4.In “Omnia responde, nec tantum siqua rogabit; Et quae nescieris, ut bene nota refer.”(221-222) the gender, number and case of "quae" and "nota" are accusative neuter plural, for “Omnia responde.....Et quae nescieris, ut bene nota refer.” literally means:
”Answer (responde) to all (omnia)...and  tell (refer) the things that /what (quae. direct object, neuter plural)  you don’t know (nescieris) as well (bene) known (nota. Past participle of “nosco”, I know).), i.e.:
”Answer  to all questions..and  tell what  you don’t know as if  you  knew it well"


Finally, "in eo sum ut.." the literally meaning of  the adverb of place "eo" which stands for “in eo loco” is “in that place” corresponding to “about” in “I am about to..”

Best regards,

Maria

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