Latin/grammar

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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de Officiis)

1. "Nulla sancta societas
 Nec fides regni est", (I, 26)
Does “regni” (gen.) modify both “societas” and “fides” or just “fides”?

2. Nam quicquid eius modi est, (I, 26)
Can you give a literal translation?

3. an consulto et cogitata fiat iniuria  (I, 27)
Is “consulto” related to “consultus”, the p.p. of “consulo” and “cogitate” related to “cogitatus”, the p.p. of “cogito”? Why the endings are different?

4. ut inferenda ne cui noceant iniuria (I, 28)
Is “inferenda iniuria” abl. abs. or just abl. gerund? If it is the latter, can we use abl. abs. here?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

actually this is a duplicate question that I've already answered.

Anyway, here's my previous answer:

1.In "Nulla sancta societas/Nec fides regni est" ( Cicero, De Officiis, I, 26), which is a quotation from Ennius,  the genitive  “regni” depends on the verb "est" in the sense that "no sacred fellowship nor faith/loyalty are typical of kingship" just to denote that in kingship/kingdom there is no sacred fellowship nor faith/loyalty, since lust for power beats fellowship and loyalty.

Note that “Nulla sancta societas / Nec fides regni est" literally means:
”No (nulla) sacred (sancta) fellowship (societas) nor (nec) loyalty (fides) are typical (est, in the 3rd person singular as a concordatio ad sensum) of kingship (regni, possessive genitive)”.
For the Possessive Genitive see AG 343 c.


2. Here’s the literal translation of “Nam quicquid eius modi est...” (I, 26):”In fact (nam) any thing /whatever (quicquid) is (est) of such (eius) nature (modi)...”, just to denote that in a situation  of such  nature , i.e. in kingship,  where the majority cannot excel and the competition is so great, it is impossible to maintain a “sacred fellowship” (sancta societas).



3. In “.... an consulto et cogitata fiat iniuria”  (I, 27) the ablative “consulto”, used as an adverb meaning “deliberately”,  is related to  the neuter noun “consultum”, which derives from the p.p. of “consulo”.
As for  the nominative feminine singular “cogitata”,  which is agreeing with “iniuria”, it is related to “cogitatus”, the p.p. of “cogito”, and literally means:”meditated”.

In short, “...an consulto et cogitata fiat iniuria”  literally means:
”whether (an)  a wrong/injury (iniuria) is done (fiat) deliberately (consulto) and having been meditated (cogitata)”.


4. ut inferenda ne cui noceant iniuria (I, 28) “inferenda iniuria”  is not an abl. abs., but  a passive periphrastic  where “iniuria” is the subject, and “inferenda [est]” is the verb, while “ut” is used here to introduce a general statement for confirmation, and then means:” considering that” (see http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=ut&la=la&can=ut1&prior=assequuntur&d)

In short, “ut inferenda ne cui noceant iniuria” literally means:
”. . ..considering that (ut) an injury /wrong (iniuria) must be endured (inferenda [est]) in order that they do not damage (ne... noceant, final clause) anyone (cui, i.e. “alicui” that drops the first part after “ne”)”, i.e. :
“considering that an injury must be endured in order that they do not damage anyone” or “as they do no wrong to anyone”.

Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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