Latin/Ceriolum

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Question
Hello Michael,

Found in the Liddel-Scott Dictionary of Ancient Greek—thus, unlikely to be a typo—is the q67cmLatin word, "ceriolum." I can't find this word (hence, it's meaning) anywhere else. Nearest I can get to it is the element Cerium, which I doubt is the same thing, since the Romans didn't know cerium.

Any ideas?

regards,
Bill

Answer
You didn't indicate the Greek word to which the Latin word was associated, but "ceriolum" is used in Late Latin for a small wax taper.  The derivation is from the Classical Latin "cereus," meaning a wax taper, with the diminutive suffix added.  Other Late Latin words used for wax tapers are "cereolarium" and "ceriolare".

Cerium, element no. 58, derives from the name of the Roman goddess of the harvest, Ceres, or perhaps after the first large asteroid discovered, Ceres, named after the goddess.  The name of the goddess appears to have no connection to the Latin "cereus", but derives from the Latin "gerere" (to produce, as of the harvest).  

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Martin

Expertise

Classical Languages (Greek, Latin). Conversant with Classical Greek and all forms of the Latin language: classical, mediaeval, and modern.

Experience

I have 50 years of teaching at all levels of Latin from high school through university postgraduate. I read, write, and speak Latin daily.

Organizations
American Classical League.

Education/Credentials
A.B., M.A., D.Phil. (h.c.) in Classical Languages (Greek, Latin).

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