Latin/grammar

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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de Officiis)

1. sed tamen ira procul absit, cum qua nihil recte fieri, nihil considerate potest.(136)
Is “qua” sing. f. abl. relative pron, referring to “ira”? and “cum” means “since”? Can we use “ea” instead of “qua” here?

2. atque etiam illud ipsum, quod acerbitatis habet obiurgatio, significandum est, ipsius id causa, qui obiurgetur, esse susceptum (137)
The grammar of this sentence is not clear to me. A literal translation would help.

3. Cn. Octavio … honori fuisse accepimus, quod praeclaram aedificasset in Palatio et plenam dignitatis domum, quae cum vulgo viseretur, suffragata domino, novo homini, ad consulatum putabatur. (138)
What does “honori fuisse” mean? Does “quod” mean “because” here? Finally, Is there supposed to an infinitive such as “suffragata [esse]” after “putabatur”?

4. in ceteris habenda ratio non sua solum, sed etiam aliorum (139)
Does “sua” go with “ratio” and what does “sua ratio” mean?

Thank you,
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “….sed tamen ira procul absit, cum qua nihil recte fieri,nihil considerate potest” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 136)  “qua” is exactly the sing. fem. abl. relative pron, referring to the “ira”,while “cum” does not mean “since”, but designates a kind of accompaniment as the preposition “cum” is considered as attending or accompanying the action.
Finally you cannot use “ea” instead of “qua”, for the relative pronoun is used as a connection with the previous phrase.

So, “…sed tamen ira procul absit, cum qua nihil recte fieri, nihil considerate potest” literally means: ”but (sed) however (tamen) let  be far( procul absit, hortatory subjunctive) anger (ira) with which (cum qua, a kind of ablative of accompaniment) nothing (nihil) can (potest) be done (fieri) rightly (recte), nothing (nihil) considerately”,i.e.: ”but however  be anger far  from us, as in anger  nothing right or judicious can be done”.


2. Here’s the literal translation of “….atque etiam illud ipsum, quod acerbitatis habet obiurgatio, significandum est, ipsius id causa, qui obiurgetur, esse susceptum” (I, 137):
”...and  it must be shown that (significandum est, passive periphrastic, impersonal construction) also (atque etiam)  that very sense (illud ipsum ) of severity (acerbitatis) that ( “quod”) reproof (obiurgatio, subject) has (habet), has been used (susceptum esse , verb of the object-clause depending on “significandum est) just (id, used adverbially) for the sake (causā) of the same person (ipsius) who (qui) is reproved (obiurgetur)”, i.e.:
“...and  it must be shown that  also  that very  sense  of severity which  goes with our reproof is used  just for the good of the one who is reproved”.



3.Note that in “ Cn. Octavio … honori fuisse accepimus, quod praeclaram aedificasset in Palatio et plenam dignitatis domum, quae cum vulgo viseretur, suffragata domino, novo homini, ad consulatum putabatur” (I, 138):

a)"Cn. Octavio …honori fuisse” is a double dative literally  meaning “to have been for honour to Cn.Octavius” (See AG 382), i.e.:”We have heard (accepimus) that  it was (fuisse) for honour (honori, dative of the End) to Cn.Octavius (Cn.Octavio, Dative of the person affected)….”

b)“quod” means ”the fact that” in this Substantive Clause (See AG 572) .

c)it is correct to suppose the infinitive “suffragata [esse]” after “putabatur”.

In short, here’s the literal translation:
”We have heard (accepimus) that it was (fuisse) for honour (honori, dative of the End) to Cn.Octavius (Cn.Octavio, Dative of the person affected) the fact that (quod, introducing the  Substantive clause) he had built (aedificasset) upon the Palatine (in Palatio) a magnificent(praeclaram)  and full (plenam) of dignity (dignitatis) house (domum), which (quae, referring to "domum"), being seen (cum viseretur) by people (vulgo), it was thought(putabatur)  to have  gained votes (suffragata [esse], Subject clause with nominative and infinitive depending on “putabatur”) for [its]owner (domino), a new (novo)  man (homini, with reference to “the first of his family who obtained a curule office, a man newly ennobled”) towards the consulship (ad consulatum)”, i.e.:
"We have heard that it was of great honour to Gnaeus Octavius....to have built upon the Palatine a splendid and imposing house which everybody went to see and was thought to have gained votes for the owner, a new man, in his aspiration to the consulship".


4.In “…. in ceteris habenda ratio non sua solum, sed etiam aliorum (I, 139) the possessive  “sua” goes with “ratio” and then the sentence  literally  means: “…in all the other things (in ceteris) not only (non solum)  the own (sua)  consideration(ratio, subject of the passive periphrastic) must be used(habenda est), but also (sed etiam)[the consideration] of the others (aliorum)”, i.e.: …in everything else one must have regard not only for himself,  but also for others …”


Best,

Maria

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