You are here:

Latin/Latim Translation

Advertisement


Question
Hello,Maria him Rafael From south america and i would like to ask  your help to translate this phrase from Beyond gold and evil to latim:
"He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you."
best regards
Rafael.

Answer
Hello,

here’s the translation of  Aphorism 146 in “Beyond Good and Evil" by  Friedrich Nietzsche:

“Qui contra  pugnat monstra caveat ne monstrum fiat ipse. Cum autem  diu contemplaris barathrum, te etiam  contemplatur barathrum”
(He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you).


Read more below.

Best regards,

Maria
_________________________________________________________________________
Note that:

-He who = QUI (relative pronoun, nominative masculine singular)

-fights = PUGNAT (present indicative of PUGNO, I fight)

-with =CONTRA (preposition which takes the accusative case)

-monsters =MONSTRA (direct object, accusative plural of the neuter noun MONSTRUM, 2nd declension)

-should look to it =CAVEAT (hortatory subjunctive of the verb CAVEO meaning “I take heed that)  

-that he does not become =NE  FIAT (negative  NE + the present subjunctive FIAT, 3rd person singular, from the verb FIO)

-himself  =IPSE (pronoun, nominative masculine singular)

-a monster =MONSTRUM (nominative neuter).Note that in the neuter nouns the nominative and the accusative are the same.

-And = AUTEM (conjunction)

-when = CUM (conjunction introducing the subordinate temporal clause)

-you gaze … into = CONTEMPLARIS (2nd person singular, present indicative of the deponent verb CONTEMPLOR)

-long = DIU (adverb)

-an abyss =BARATHRUM (direct object, accusative, neuter noun, 2nd declension)

-the abyss =BARATHRUM (subject, nominative,  neuter noun, 2nd declension).Note that in the neuter nouns the nominative and the accusative are the same.

-also =ETIAM (conjunction)

-gazes into =CONTEMPLATUR (3rd person singular, present indicative of the deponent verb CONTEMPLOR)

-you = TE (2nd person singular pronoun, direct object, accusative case)

As you can see, Latin word order is different from English as Latin is an inflected language where grammatical relationships are indicated by the endings, not by the order of the words.

Latin

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Maria

Expertise

I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

Experience

Over 25 years teaching experience.

Education/Credentials
I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

This expert accepts donations:

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.