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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de Officiis)

1. Quare quamquam a Cratippo nostro, principe huius memoriae philosophorum, haec te assidue audire atque accipere confido, tamen conducere arbitror talibus aures tuas vocibus undique circumsonare, nec eas, …quicquam aliud audire (III. 5)
Could you translate “principe huius memoriae philosophorum”? Does the accu.+inf. clause “aures tuas … circumsonare” belong to “conducere” or “arbitror”? Does “eas” refer to “aures tuas”?

2. Panaetius igitur, qui …, quod promiserat. (III.7)
This is a very long sentence. I understand its meaning. The problem I have is that grammatically I couldn’t identify the main verb associated with “Panaetius”.

3. de quo ageretur (III. 7)
What does it mean?

4. Accedit eodem testis locuples Posidonius (III. 10)
Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you,
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “Quare quamquam a Cratippo nostro, principe huius memoriae philosophorum, haec te assidue audire atque accipere confido, tamen conducere arbitror talibus aures tuas vocibus undique circumsonare, nec eas, …quicquam aliud audire “ (Cicero, De Officiis, III. 5) “principe huius memoriae philosophorum” literally means:” the most eminent (principe, apposition in the ablative agreeing with the ablative “Cratippo” ) of the philosophers (philosophorum) of this (huius) time (memoriae)”.
As for “…conducere arbitror talibus aures tuas vocibus undique circumsonare…”,  the accu.+inf. clause “aures tuas … circumsonare” depends on “arbitror” which is followed by “conducere” meaning “to be useful”; moreover  in”…nec eas…” the feminine accusative plural pronoun “eas” refers to “aures tuas”, of course.
In short, here’s the literal translation of the above passage:
”So (quare) though (quamquam) I believe (confido)  that you (te) continually  (assidue) hear (audire)  and learn (atque accipere) these things/ principles (haec) from our Cratippus (a Cratippo nostro), the most eminent (principe) of the philosophers (philosophorum) of this (huius) time (memoriae), however (tamen) I think (arbitror) to be useful (conducere) that your ears ( aures tuas )  resound on every side (undique circumsonare) with such words (talibus…vocibus) and they  (nec eas,i.e. your ears,  subject of the object clause) do not hear (audire) anything (quicquam) else ( aliud)”.


2. In “ Panaetius igitur, qui …, quod promiserat”  (III.7) the main verb associated with “Panaetius” is firstly “explicavit”, secondly “scripsit” and lastly “exsolvit” that you can read  in “…de duobus generibus primis tribus libris explicavit, de tertio autem genere deinceps se scripsit dicturum nec exsolvit id, quod promiserat” literally meaning:
” Panetius ….dealt (explicavit)  with (de) the first (primis) two matters (duobus generibus) in three books (tribus libris), but (autem) he wrote (scripsit)  that he (se) will discuss (dicturum) afterwards (deinceps) about the third topic (de tertio genere) but did not keep (exsolvit) what he had promised (quod promiserat)”.


3. In “…honestumne id esset, de quo ageretur  an …”(III. 7) the relative clause “de quo ageretur”  related to the antecedent  pronoun “id” means:”.. about which (de quo) it was discussed/one was discussing (ageretur, impersonal construction)” so that “…honestumne id esset, de quo ageretur …” means:”... whether  (-ne) it was honest (honestum esset, disjunctive interrogation ) what (id) about which (de quo) one was discussing  (ageretur) or (an)…”


4.“Accedit eodem testis locuples Posidonius…” (III. 10) literally means:”In that direction (eodem) Posidonius goes ( accedit) as a credible (locuples) witness (testis, apposition)…” just to say that Posidonius agrees with Panetius.

Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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