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Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following (all from de Officiis)

1. Haec rogatio ad ea pertinet, quae paulo ante dixi honeste amico a iudice posse concedi.(III. 44)
Is “honeste amico a iudice posse concede” a clause after “dixi”? But what is the accu. to go with the inf. “posse”? It seems it cannot be “quae”, which is f. nom and not “accu.”

2. Damonem et Phintiam Pythagoreos ferunt hoc animo inter se fuisse III. 45)
Why accu. for “Pythagoreos”? The use of “amico” is also not clear to me.

3. ut, cum eorum alteri Dionysius tyrannus diem necis destinavisset (III. 45)
What is “necis”?

4. vas factus sit alter eius sistendi (III. 45)
Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you,
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “Haec rogatio ad ea pertinet, quae paulo ante dixi honeste amico a iudice posse concedi…” (Cicero, De Officiis, III. 44) the passage “honeste amico a iudice posse concedi” is a clause after “dixi” and the accusative which goes with the infinitive “posse” is just the neuter plural “quae”, which  can be both nominative neuter and accusative neuter and refers to the antecedent pronoun  “ea” (neuter plural).
Please note that “Haec rogatio ad ea pertinet, quae paulo ante dixi honeste amico a iudice posse concedi…” literally means:
”This request (Haec rogatio) deals (pertinet) with (ad) those things ( ea, neuter plural in the accusative depending on “ad”) that (quae, accusative neuter plural) I’ve said (dixi) a short time ago(paulo ante) to be able  (posse) to be conceded (concedi, passive, present infinitive) honestly (honeste) by a judge (a iudice) to a friend(amico, dative)”, i.e.:
“Such a request deals with those favours that, as  I’ve just said, a judge can honestly concede  to a friend”.  


2. In “Damonem et Phintiam Pythagoreos ferunt hoc animo inter se fuisse …” (III. 45) the accusative plural “Pythagoreos” is in apposition with “Damonem et Phintiam”.
As for  the use of the ablative  “animo”, it  is a kind of  Ablative of Specification depending on the verb “esse” (See AG 418).
In short, “Damonem et Phintiam Pythagoreos ferunt hoc animo inter se fuisse...” literally means:
”They say/people say (ferunt) that the Pythagorean school disciples/followers (Pythagoreos)  Damon and Phintias (Damonem et Phintiam) were (fuisse) in this  (hoc) mood (animo) one another (inter se)..”, i.e.:
“People say that Damon and Phintias, followers of the Pythagorean school, enjoyed such  mutual friendship..”.

3.In “….ut, cum eorum alteri Dionysius tyrannus diem necis destinavisset …”(III. 45)the  word “necis” is the genitive singular of the feminine noun “nex” meaning “execution”, so that the sentence means:”..so that (ut)  when (cum)  the tyrant Dionysius (Dionysius tyrannus ) had appointed (destinavisset) a day (diem)  for the execution (necis, lit. “of the execution”) of one (alteri, dative.Literlly, “to one”) of them (eorum)..”.

4. Here’s the literal translation of “….vas factus sit alter eius sistendi “ (III. 45):
”…. the other (alter) became (factus sit) surety (vas, nominative, 3rd declension) for his appearance (eius sistendi, gerundive in the genitive. Literally, “of  him appearing ”),i.e.:  
..the other acted as surety for his appearance ..” just to say that Damon and Phintias were so good friends that when the tyrant Dionysius had appointed a day for the executing of Phintias who however requested a few days for  saying goodbye to his loved ones, Damon acted as surety for his return with the promise that, if his friend did not return, he himself should be put to death.
For the Genitive of the Gerund and Gerundive see AG 504.

Best regards,

Maria

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