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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you please help me with the following (all from De Ira):

1. Si intrassem ualetudinarium exercitus ut sciens … (De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 4)
How to understand “ut sciens”?

2. civitati curandae adhibitus sum (De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 4)
Could you give a literal translation?

3. et agi lege iubebo non iratus sed severus (De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 5)
Why “lege” and not “iubebo legem agi (accu.+inf. “order the law to be enforced”)”?

4. cum cervicem noxio imperabo praecidi …(De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 5)
Why abl. “noxio”?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “Si intrassem ualetudinarium exercitus ut sciens … (Seneca, De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 4)  “exercitus ut sciens” literally  means: “as (ut, preposition used to describe the purpose or quality of someone or something) the one who knows/ has  knowledge (sciens, present participle of “scio”) [of medicine]” [and] has experience /is skilled  (exercitus;past participle of “exerceo”in the  nominative masculine agreeing with “sciens”)“, i.e. “as an expert physician”, since Seneca talks about a hospital (valetudinarium, neuter noun).


2. Here’s the literal translation for “….civitati curandae adhibitus sum”  (De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 4): “…I was charged (adhibitus sum, passive  perfect ) with curing (curandae, gerundive, dative in the feminine singular agreeing with “civitati”)the  body of citizens (civitati,dative of the noun used in the gerundive depending on “adhibitus sum”)”, i.e. :“I was called to cure the body of citizens”
For gerundive see AG 503-505.


3. In “…et agi lege iubebo non iratus sed severus” (De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 5)
“lege”  is an ablative of Manner  meaning “by law/ in accordance with the law”, so that “…et agi lege iubebo” literally means:” …and [being] not  angry (non iratus) but grave (sed severus) I will order(iubebo) that it must be acted/it is acted (agi,verb of the object-clause, present infinitive passive of “ago”) in accordance with the law”(lege), i.e.: “..and not with anger, but with sternness, I will order  to act in accordance with the law “.
Note that “…order the law to be enforced” is a free translation, of course.



4. In “… cum cervicem noxio imperabo praecidi …(De Ira, book I, chapter 16, section 5)
“noxio” is not an ablative, but a dative of “noxius” depending on “praecidi”, so that “…cum cervicem noxio imperabo praecidi …” literally means:” …when (cum) I will command (imperabo) that the head (cervicem) is cut off (praecidi, present infinitive, passive form) to a guilty (noxio)..”, i.e.: “…when I command a criminal to be beheaded”.

Best regards,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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