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Latin/Results not Excuses

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Question
Maria,

I'm trying to construct a motto of "Results not Excuses" in Latin.  I searched for words in a Latin dictionary, but after living in Italy for three years, I know how easy it is to get it wrong.

What I put together was:  Effectus non Excuso.

How'd I do?

Sincerely,

Jerry

Answer
Hello,

“Results not Excuses” can be translated correctly as follows:

-“Facta, non excusationes”

-“Exitus, non excusationes”.

-"Effectus, non excusationes"

In my opinion, the best translation is "Facta, non excusationes” where I've used the term "Facta" (literally, "deeds") which implies exactly the sense of "results".

As for “Effectus non Excuso”, I’m sorry, but it is wrong because the last word “Excuso”  means “I excuse” as it is the 1st. person singular, present indicative of the verb “excusare” meaning “to excuse”, and therefore the phrase "Effectus non Excuso" would mean "Results not I excuse" which makes no sense at all, of course.

Read more below.

Best regards,

Maria
___________________________________________________________________________________________
Note that:

-Results = FACTA (nominative neuter plural of the noun FACTUM, 2nd declension) or EXITUS (nominative masculine  plural of the noun EXITUS, 4th declension) or finally  EFFECTUS (nominative masculine  plural of the noun EFFECTUS, 4th declension)

-not = NON

-Excuses = EXCUSATIONES (nominative feminine plural of the noun EXCUSATIO, 3rd  declension)  

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Maria

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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