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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you please help me with the following (all from De Ira III):

1. vetat illam nobis exsecari (De Ira, 3.3.1)
Is “nobis” inside the accu. + inf. clause after “vetat” and means “by us”?

2. sed ipse eius exactor animo simul ac manu saevit carissimorum eorumque quae mox amissa fleturus est carnifex (De Ira, 3.3.3)
Could you give a literal translation?

3. et in malum suum ualidae in quas aegrum morbus et accessio erexit. (De Ira, 3.3.4)
Could you give a literal translation?

4. quasi dubiae apud homines opinionis sit (De Ira, 3.3.5)
Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,


1.In “…vetat illam nobis exsecari” (Seneca, De Ira, 3.3.1) the abl.  “nobis” inside the accu. + inf. clause after “vetat”  means “from us”, i.e. literally”…he (Aristotle) does not permit (vetat) that it [i.e.anger ] is removed/cut out (exsecari) from us (nobis, abl.of Separation without the preposition “ex” which is implied in the verb “ex-secari”)” in the sense that Aristotle forbids us to remove anger  because he thinks that anger is a spur to virtue.

2. “….sed ipse eius exactor animo simul ac manu saevit carissimorum eorumque quae mox amissa fleturus est carnifex ..”(De Ira, 3.3.3)literally means:”…but (sed) he himself (ipse) as an executor (exactor, used as an  apposition) of  it (eius, pronoun referring to “ultionem”[revenge] in “mandat ultionem suam” of the previous sentence)  acts cruelly (saevit) with mind (animo, abl.of means) and  at the same time (simul ac) with  arm (manu, abl.of means) and is (est) the executioner/persecutor (carnifex) of  those persons who are dearest (carissimorum) and (-que) of those things (eorum) that (quae) just lost (mox amissa, accusative neuter plural relating to “quae”) he will regret/he is about to regret (fleturus est, first periphrastic)”, in the sense that a man who is beside himself with fury/anger does not entrust his revenge to another, but he  himself exacts it and acts cruelly in purpose and in deed so that he becomes the persecutor of those persons he loves as well as of those things for which, when lost, he is destined to weep.


3.Here’s the literal translation of “…Caducae sinistraeque sunt vires et  in malum suum ualidae in quas aegrum morbus et accessio erexit…” (De Ira, 3.3.4): “…Frail (caducae) and  unfavourable (sinistraeque) and potent  (et…validae) [only] for its own harm (in malum suum) are (sunt) bodily strengths (vires)  to whom (in quas)  the disease (morbus) and its attack/ paroxysm drove (erexit, agreeing with only one of the two subjects) the sick man (aegrum)”, in the sense that  strength which cheers a sick man up  is bad and frail if it derives from sickness and its attacks, i.e. from anger  and its attacks.



4. “…quasi dubiae apud homines opinionis sit” (De Ira, 3.3.5) literally means:”..as if (quasi) it (i.e. this opinion about anger that I consider a bad thing) was (sit) of dubious (dubiae) opinion (opinionis, a genitive of quality) among (apud) men (homines)”,i.e. “… as if men had doubts about this” just to point out that men do not doubt that anger is a bad passion.

Best regards,
Maria

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