Latin/grammar

Advertisement


Question
Dear Maria,
Could you please help me with the following (all from De Ira):

1. adice dentium inter se arietatorum ut aliquem esse cupientium non alium sonum quam (De Ira, 3.4.2)
Does “dentium inter se arietatorum” (gen.) modify “sonum”? Also, why inf. “esse”?

2. ira inpendit, paucis gratuita est (De Ira, 3.5.4)
Not clear about the case of “paucis”.

3. Nulli fortuna tam dedita est ut multa temptanti ubique respondeat (De Ira, 3.6.5)
Could you give a literal translation of the ut-clause?

4. Quotiens aliquid conaberis, te simul et ea quae paras quibusque pararis ipse metire (De Ira, 3.7.2)
It seems that “quae” and “quibus” refer to the same: “that [quae] you prepare” and “that for which [quibus] you are prepared for”. But the sentence says you are supposed to “metire”  “te” and “ea”, that is “you” and “the thing”. A bit confused.

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “…..adice dentium inter se arietatorum ut aliquem esse cupientium non alium sonum quam est apris tela sua adtritu acuentibus…” (Seneca, De Ira, 3.4.2) “dentium …. arietatorum”  is just a genitive depending on the accusative “sonum”.
As for the  infinitive “esse” in the object-clause “aliquem esse”, it depends on the present participle, genitive plural “cupientium” agreeing with “dentium”.

So, here’s the literal translation:”…Add (adice) the sound (sonum) of teeth (dentium) which clash (arietatorum, past participle of “arieto”) among (inter) themselves (se) as (ut) wishing (cupientium, referring to “dentium”) that there is (esse, verb of the object-clause) somebody (aliquem, subject of the object-clause) [to be devoured], [a sound, see “sonum” ] not different (non alium) than (quam) [ the sound] which belongs (est ) to wild boars (apris, dative of possession) which sharp (acuentibus, predicate participle agreeing with “apris”)his(sua) weapons /tusks (tela) by rubbing (adtritu, abl.of means)…”, i.e. :“…Add the sound of clashing teeth, as if they were ready to devour somebody, just like the sound the wild boar makes when he sharpens his tusks by rubbing”.


2.In “…ira inpendit, paucis gratuita est”  (De Ira, 3.5.4) the word “paucis” is a dative of Reference (see AG 377) so that “paucis gratuita est” literally means:” it (i.e. anger) is free of charge (gratuita) for /to  few (paucis)”, just to say that anger is expensive (ira impendit) , whereas it is free of charge only for few people.

  
3. In “Nulli fortuna tam dedita est ut multa temptanti ubique respondeat..” (De Ira, 3.6.5) a literal translation of the ut-clause is the following:
”…so (tam) ..that (ut, introducing a consecutive clause, aka clause of result) she (i.e. fortune) everywhere/in any case (ubique, adverb) responds (respondeat) to the one who is trying /making (temptanti, dative, present participle) many things/attempts (multa)“ in the sense that to no man Fortune is so devoted  that she  always responds to this man’s many attempts to have good fortune.



4. In “Quotiens aliquid conaberis, te simul et ea quae paras quibusque pararis ipse, metire” (De Ira, 3.7.2) both  the neuter plural pronouns “quae” and “quibus” refer to the same: “that [quae] you prepare” and “that for which [quibus] yourself (ipse) are prepared  (pararis, passive form)”.

Please note that “… te simul et ea quae paras quibusque pararis ipse, metire” literally means:
”…measure (metire, 2nd person singular, imperative of the deponent verb “metior”) you (te) and those things (et ea) that ( quae) you prepare (paras) and for which (quibusque) you yourself (ipse) are prepared (pararis)”,  in the sense that whenever you will attempt anything, you must measure yourself and at the same time both the things you want to do and the things for which you are intended.

In short, it’s obvious that the “you” is expressed by “te” depending on the imperative “metire”  and is implied in the 2nd person singular of the verbs “paras”(active form, present indicative)  and “pararis”(passive form, present indicative) as well as in the 2nd person singular, present imperative “metire”, on which  also the accusative neuter plural “ea” depends.

Hope this is clear enough.

Best regards,
Maria

Latin

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Maria

Expertise

I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

Experience

Over 25 years teaching experience.

Education/Credentials
I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

This expert accepts donations:

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.