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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you please help me with the following (all from De Ira III):

1. cum sciam tyrannorum quoque tumida et fortuna et licentia ingenia familiarem sibi saeuitiam repressisse (De Ira, 3.11.3)
Is the following understanding correct?
“tyrannorum ingenia” [n. pl. accu.] is the subj. in the accu. + inf. clause after “sciam”;  
“tumida” adj. n. pl. modifies “ingenia”
“et fortuna et licentia” abl. of cause, modifying “tumida”  

2. sua manu ipse caesurus; postquam intellexit irasci se, sicut sustulerat manum suspensam detinebat et stabat percussuro similis (De Ira, 3.12.5)
Could you give a literal translation?

3. nec erat illi exprobratio latitantis irae ingrata. (De Ira, 3.13.3)
Is the following order for translation correct:
nec exprobratio [subj.] latitantis irae [gen. of the man concealing his anger].erat ingrata illi [dat. to the man]
Why “irae” not in accu. since it seems to be the obj. of “latitantis”?

4. Dii illum male perdant animo magis quam condicione mancipium! (De Ira, 3.14.3)
Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.Note that in “…. cum sciam tyrannorum quoque tumida et fortuna et licentia ingenia familiarem sibi saeuitiam repressisse…” (Seneca, De Ira, 3.11.3):

a) “tyrannorum ingenia” [n. pl. accu. + genitive plural] is the subj. in the accu. + inf. clause after “sciam”.
b) “tumida” adj. n. pl. modifies “ingenia”
c)“et fortunā et licentiā” are abl. of cause, depending on “tumida”.  

In short, the passage literally means:”… since I know (cum sciam) that even (quoque) the puffed up (tumidă) with success (et fortunā)  and excessive power (et licentiā) temperaments (ingeniă) of despots (tyrannorum) have repressed (repressisse) the cruelty  (saevitiam) [that was ] habitual (familiarem)  to them (sibi)”,just to point out that even tyrants, who are  puffed up with success and power, have however repressed their habitual cruelty.  


2. Here’s the literal translation for “…..sua manu ipse caesurus; postquam intellexit irasci se, sicut sustulerat manum suspensam detinebat et stabat percussuro similis…” (De Ira, 3.12.5):

”….he himself (ipse) being about to flog (caesurus, future participle of “caedo”) [him, i.e. his slave] with his own hand (sua manu); after (postquam) realizing/ he realized (intellexit) that he (se) was angry (irasci), just as (sicut) he had  raised (sustulerat) [his] hand (manum) he held (detinebat) [it ] up in the air (suspensam, agreeing with “manum”) and stayed (stabat), [being] similar (similis, nominative agreeing with the implied subject of the verb ”stabat”)  to one which is about to flog (percussuro, future participle, dative depending on “similis”)…”.



3.In “…. nec erat illi exprobratio latitantis irae ingrata”  (De Ira, 3.13.3) the following order for translation is correct: ”nec exprobratio [subj.] latitantis [genitive, present participle used as an adjective agreeing with the genitive “irae”]  erat ingrata illi [dat. to the man, i.e. Socrates]” literally meaning :“…nor (nec) the reproach (exprobratio) of the latent anger (latitantis irae) was (erat) unwelcome (ingrata)  for him (illi)”.

As you can see, “irae” is not the obj. of “latitantis”, but a genitive depending on “exprobratio” which governs “latitantis irae”.



4.“Dii illum male perdant animo magis quam condicione mancipium!” (De Ira, 3.14.3) literally means:
”May the gods destroy(Dii …male perdant, Optative Subjunctive ) such a  man (illum, direct object), a slave (mancipium, accusative used in apposition to the direct object “illum”) in spirit (animo, ablative of Specification. See AG 418) more than (magis quam) in condition (condicione (abl of Specification)”, with reference to king Cambyses who acts as a slave rather than a king, since he is a slave to drink.


Kind regards,

Maria

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