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Question
Dear Maria,
Could you please help me with the following (all from De Ira III):

1. nam si qua alia in Philippo virtus, fuit et contumeliarum patientia (De Ira, 3.23.2)
What are the meanings of “alia” and “et” in this sentence?

2. ac tota civitate direptus est (De Ira, 3.23.5)
Basore translates “direptus” as “lionized” but I couldn’t find that meaning in the dictionary.

3. cuius non diligentia aliquando sibi ipsa excidat (De Ira, 3.24.4)
Does “ipsa” go with “cuius diligentia” and not with “sibi”, which refers to the person.

4. Adice nunc quod id agis, ut … (De Ira, 3.26.1)
Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “…..nam si qua alia in Philippo virtus, fuit et contumeliarum patientia…” (Seneca, De Ira, 3.23.2) the adjective “alia” ( nominative feminine singular ) which agrees with “qua…. virtus”  means “other”, while  “et”  before “contumeliarum patientia” means “also”.
So, “….. si qua alia in Philippo virtus, fuit et contumeliarum patientia…” literally means:” ….for (nam) if (si) some (qua, instead of “aliqua”) other (alia) virtue (virtus) [there was] in Philip (in Philippo), there was (fuit) also (et, instead of “etiam”) the tolerance (patientia) of insults (contumeliarum)…”, i.e. “…. for if Philip had some other  virtue, he had also the ability to endure insults /offences…”.


2. In “….ac tota civitate direptus est …”(De Ira, 3.23.5) “direptus est ” is the passive perfect tense of the verb “diripio” which can also mean “I contend for”, so that “….ac tota civitate direptus est ..” literally means: “…and (ac) he was contended (direptus est) by the whole city (tota civitate)", just to point out that the whole city  adored Timagenes and treated him as if he was famous.



3.In “….cuius non diligentia aliquando sibi ipsa excidat…” (De Ira, 3.24.4) the nominative feminine singular  “ipsa” goes with “cuius diligentia” and not with “sibi”, which refers to the person, so that “….cuius non diligentia aliquando sibi ipsa excidat…” literally means:”….whose (cuius) diligence itself ( diligentia…ipsa) sometimes (aliquando) does not fail (non...excidat) himself (sibi, dative depending on "excidat")”, i.e. “…no man is so guarded that he does not sometimes let his diligence lapse”.



4. “Adice nunc quod id agis, ut  et iram feras et iniuriam. (De Ira, 3.26.1) means:” Add (adice, 2nd person singular, present imperative of "adicio")  now (nunc) the fact that (quod, conjunction depending on “adice”. See AG 572 for Substantive Clause) you are doing (agis) this (id) in order that (ut, introducing a final/purpose clause) you tolerate (feras) both (et) anger (iram) and (et) offence (iniuriam)”, i.e.: “Add now the fact that what you propose  is to tolerate both anger and offence”.


Best regards,

Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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