Latin/grammar

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Dear Maria,
Could you help me with the following? They are all from Seneca’s Epistles.

1. sed idem hoc omnes tibi ex omni domo conclamabunt, … (XXIX. 11)
“hoc” is singular but “omnes” is pl. Do they go together, serving as the subject of “conclamabunt”?

2. Similem te illis facias oportet (XXIX. 11)
I’m comparing this sentence with “me abire oportet”. (1) it seems we don’t necessarily need to use inf. after “oportet.
(2) is “te” the obj of “facias”? so it is different from “me” in the sentence I quoted from the dictionary.

3. Ceterum, si te videro celebrem secundis vocibus vulgi, (XXIX.12)
Could you give a literal translation?

4. si intrante te clamor et plausus, pantomimica ornamenta, obstrepuerint, si tota civitate te feminae puerique laudaverint, (XXIX.12)
(1) The dictionary says that “obstrepo” takes dat. but both “te” and “intranet”, which matches “te”, are not dat.
(2) Could not find the word “pantomimica”.
(3) are “feminae puerique” the subj. of “laudaverint”? Why abl for “tota civitate”?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “…sed idem hoc omnes tibi ex omni domo conclamabunt, …” (Seneca, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium, XXIX. 11) the neuter singular demonstrative pronoun “hoc” goes with the neuter singular  pronoun “idem” as they both are the direct object of “conclamabunt” whose subject is the nominative masculine plural “omnes”.
In short, “hoc idem” serves as the direct object of the future “conclamabunt”, so that the literal translation sounds as follows:”… but all (sed…omnes, i.e. Peripatetics, Academics, Stoics, and Cynics )from every  philosophical school (ex omni domo, for “domus” in philosophical language is used as sect/ school) will state/announce  (conclamabunt) to you (tibi) this same thing/concept (hoc idem, accusative neuter singular)…..”, with reference to the Peripatetics, Academics, Stoics, and Cynics who agree on the name of Epicurus  and express the same concept (see the previous words :” Quis hoc?" inquis, tamquam nescias, cui imperem ; Epicurus”).



2. With regard to “Similem te illis facias oportet “(XXIX. 11),literally meaning: “It is necessary (oportet) that you make (facias, present subjunctive, 2nd person singular) yourself (te, direct object of “facias”) similar (similem, predicate accusative agreeing with “te”) to those /them (illis)...”,  please note that:

-(1) we don’t necessarily need to use the infinitive  after “oportet” as this impersonal verb can also take the subjunctive.
-(2) the 2nd person singular  pronoun “te” is just  the direct object of “facias”.
-(3) in “me abire oportet”, literally meaning “It is necessary (oportet) that I (me) go away( abire),  the 1st person singular pronoun “me” is the subject of the object-clause whose verb is the infinitive “abire”, whereas in “Similem te illis facias oportet “, literally meaning  “It is necessary (oportet) that you make (facias, present subjunctive, 2nd person singular) yourself (te, direct object of “facias”) similar (similem, predicate accusative agreeing with “te”) to those /them (illis)...”, the pronoun "te" is the direct object of the present subjunctive "facias".


3. Here’s the literal translation of “Ceterum, si te videro celebrem secundis vocibus vulgi,..” (XXIX.12): “Otherwise(ceterum, adverb), if I will see (si ..videro, future perfect, 1st person singular, corresponding to a simple future in English) you (te, direct object)  applauded /celebrated/famous (celebrem, adjective used as a predicate accusative referring to “te”) thanks to favourable (secundis, abl of cause) acclamations(vocibus,abl of cause)of the populace (vulgi, genitive singular) ..”



4. With regard to “…si intrante te clamor et plausus, pantomimica ornamenta, obstrepuerint, si tota civitate te feminae puerique laudaverint...” (XXIX.12), literally meaning:”...if (si) entering you/when you enter (intrante te, ablative absolute)  acclamation (clamor) and applause (et plausus), pantomimic (pantomimica,nominative neuter plural of the adjective “pantomimicus”) honours (ornamenta, nominative neuter plural) will resound (obstrepuerint,3rd pl futperf ind act, corresponding to a simple future in English), if in the whole city ([in] tota civitate)  the women  (feminae) and children (puerique) will praise (laudaverint, 3rd pl futperf ind act, corresponding to a simple future in English) you (te…”, note that:

-(1) the verb “obstrepere” takes the dative  only when it means “to make a noise against/ at  somebody” or “to be troublesome to”, but “obstrepere” means “to resound “here.
-(2) the word “pantomimica” is the neuter plural of the adjective “pantomimicus”, literally meaning  “belonging to pantomimes”, with reference to the actors in the  Roman dramatic entertainment  in which performers express meaning through gestures accompanied by music.
-(3) “feminae puerique” are exactly  the subj. of “laudaverint”, while  the ablative of place where  “tota civitate” implies the preposition “in”.

Best regards,
Maria

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