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Latin/I will not repent

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Question
Hi

I ve been looking on several websites and online translators to get the line I WILL NOT REPENT translated into Latin. I also asked someone to help me.

The results I got were:

1 et non poenitebit eum:
2 et non egerunt paenitentiam
3 non me paenitet

Number 1 and 2 or from diverse online translators, number 3 is from a person.

But when I reverse translate them I get as answers

1 and will not repent
2 they did not repent
3 I do not regret

With number 1 it makes a difference apparently with or without the ":"

I have gone through my old school books, but after 20 years, they sound like Chinese to me and it s pretty hard to find someone that actually knows Latin in Australia. I m still pretty ok with words, but with conjugations and tenses, I m just lost. Especially since there are as many interpretations as people you ask, books you check.
Can you help me please?

A million thx

Tim

Answer
Hello,

“I will not repent” translates correctly as  "ME NON PAENITEBIT" where the Latin accusative ME corresponds to the subject pronoun  “I” (1st person singular); the negative adverb NON means “not” and PAENITEBIT, which is the 3rd person singular, future tense of the impersonal verb “paenitet”, means “will…..repent”.

Please note that the impersonal verb “paenitet” (also written “poenitet”, present indicative, 3rd person singular) takes the genitive of the cause of the feeling and the accusative of the person affected.

Anyway, in the sentence “I will not repent” there is the person who experiences  the  feeling of repentance (i.e. the subject pronoun “I” that therefore is in the Latin accusative ME), whereas there is not the cause of the feeling as in for example “I will not repent (of) my sins” which would be translated as “Me non paenitebit meorum peccatorum” with “meorum peccatorum” in the genitive as the cause of the feeling.

Also note that “paenitet”/”poenitet” as impersonal verb, like other verbs of feeling such as “miseret”, "piget”, “pudet” and “taedet”, takes the accusative of the person who experiences  a feeling and the genitive of the object which excites this feeling, because the earliest  meaning of “paenitet ”/”poenitet”  was “repentance  seizes (somebody of something) ” where “repentance  seizes “(paenitet) is the verb of feeling; “somebody”(direct object, corresponding to Latin accusative) is just  the person who experiences  a feeling and “of something”(corresponding to Latin genitive) is the object which excites the feeling.

That being stated, I have to tell you that all the translations you got, i.e.: 1. “et non poenitebit eum”; 2. “et non egerunt paenitentiam” ;3.”non me paenitet” , are grammatically wrong as they would mean respectively:

-1.“He will not repent” in  the 3rd person singular because there is the accusative masculine 3rd person pronoun "eum";

-2. “They did not need repentance”(past tense) or "They do not need repentance"(present indicative) that however are different from “I will not repent”;

-3. “I do not repent” in the present indicative instead of the future indicative.

Moreover in “et non egerunt paenitentiam” the verb should have been written  “eguerunt” ( past tense) or "egent" (present indicative), both from the verb “egeo”(I need) which does not takes the accusative “paenitentiam”. Also, “et non” is wrong.


To conclude, I have to repeat that  “I will not repent” translates correctly as “Me non paenitebit” which is the only correct translation, since Latin grammar rules do not allow other interpretations because it is not true that there are as many interpretations as people you ask, books you check.
Latin grammatical and syntactical rules  are in fact very precise and  prescribe how verbs and cases absolutely must be used.


Hope I made myself understood.Feel free however to ask me again.

Best regards,

Maria
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See the following examples of the impersonal verbs "paenitet", "miseret","pudet", "piget", "taedet":

-“Me paenitet” means “I repent”; “Te paenitet” means “You repent”, “Eum paenitet” means “He repents”; “Nos paenitet” means “We repent”; “Vos paenitet” means “You repent” in the 2nd person plural; “Eos paenitet” means “They repent”, and so on with other tenses and moods.

-“Me miseret” means “I have pity”; “Te miseret” means “You have pity”, “Eum miseret” means “He has pity”; “Nos miseret” means “We have pity”; “Vos miseret” means “You have pity” in the 2nd person plural; “Eos miseret” means “They have pity”, and so on with other tenses and moods.

-“Me pudet” means “I feel ashamed”; “Te pudet” means “You feel ashamed”, “Eum pudet” means “He feels  ashamed”; “Nos pudet” means “We feel ashamed”; “Vos pudet” means “You feel ashamed” in the 2nd person plural; “Eos pudet” means “They feel ashamed”, and so on with other tenses and moods.

-“Me taedet” means “I am weary/tired”, etc.

-“Me piget” means “I feel annoyance”/I dislike”; etc.
See for example “Me huius civitatis morum piget taedetque”  meaning “I am sick and tired of the ways/customs of this state”.

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