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Latin/Motto translation

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Question
hello, I am a field medic instructor with the US Air Force Aux. Every year the instructors for each course come up with a new motto. The one we came up with this year was "for my brothers I will sacrifice". I was wondering if it would be possible for you to tell me the latin translation.

Answer
Hello,

“For my brothers I will sacrifice”  can be translated as follows:

-“Pro fratribus me devovebo ”(literally, “I will sacrifice myself for my brothers”)
or:
-“Meis deserviam fratribus” (literally, “I will devote myself to my brothers”)

Both translations are correct, of course, and then you can use th one you like better.

Note that the Latin verb “sacrifico” and its future tense “sacrificabo” (1st person singular)  cannot be used in this context, simply because in Latin this verb means “I offer / I make  a sacrifice” as in for example “I offer/ I make a sacrifice to the gods” (Latin, “Deis sacrifico”).
Therefore  the motto “For my brothers I will sacrifice”, tranlated as “Meis sacrificabo fratribus”,   would mean “I offer/ I make a sacrifice to  my brothers”  which  would make no sense at all, because your motto doesn't really mean that you will make a sacrifice to your brothers, but that you want to sacrifice yourself for your brothers or that you want to devote yourself to your brothers.

Read more below.

Best regards,

Maria

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Note that:

- For my = MEIS (dative masculine plural of the possessive adjective MEUS, agreeing with FRATRIBUS)

-brothers =FRATRIBUS (both dative and ablative plural of the noun FRATER, 3rd declension)or PRO FRATRIBUS where the preposition PRO takes the ablative and the possessive MEIS is implied.

-I will sacrifice = DESERVIAM (1st person singular, future of DESERVIO meaning “I devote myself/I sacrifice myself. The verb DESERVIO takes the dative case) or DEVOVEBO (1st person singular, future of DEVOVEO meaning “I devote myself to death”/ I sacrifice myself”. The verb DEVOVEO takes PRO + the ablative case).
Note that, as I've already said,  the Latin verb SACRIFICO cannot be used in this context, simply because in Latin this verb means “I offer /I make  a sacrifice” as in for example “I offer/ make a sacrifice to the gods”(Latin, “Deis sacrifico”).
But, when you say “For my brothers I will sacrifice”, you certainly do not want to say that you will make a sacrifice to your brothers!!

As for Latin word order, please note that it is often different from English, as Latin is an inflected language where grammatical relationships are indicated by the ending of the words, not by their order.

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

Education/Credentials
I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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