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Hello: Maria

Please let me know if this would be adequate for an accurate translation

The fighting Mindset to win a fight (alertness, aggressiveness, coolness, ruthlessness, Decisiveness)

Using proper Tactics would be the skillful manipulation of time and distance to create an advantage

Having the proper Skill set to execute the movements that make tactics possible

Gear the items that we use to help us sustain the fight and win the fight

The Luck to survive or win the fight
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Hello! The expert can't answer your

Hello:
If you could I'd like some help translating the following words from English to Latin.

Mindset
Tactics
Skill
Gear
Luck

Following is the reason:

Sorry, but it is impossible to translate these words into Latin unless you put every noun in a sentence which is able to explain the right sense of each of them.

Latin is in fact a very precise language where every word can have a different translation according to its meaning in the context where this word is placed.

In short, no correct translation is possible for these words that are taken out of context: hence the many mistakes that we find in automatic online translators which in fact are really untrustworthy.

Bye,
Maria

Answer
Hello,

Thanks for explaining the sense of every word by putting each of them in an appropriate context so that it is now possible to tell you the  right Latin noun or verb, according to the sentences where they are.

I have however to point out that all Latin words change their ending according to their role in a sentence, for Latin is an inflected language with five declensions, six cases (nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, vocative, ablative), four conjugations, many different moods and tenses and many syntactical and grammatical rules which do not exist in English.

So,I can only tell you the nominative singular of  the nouns “mindset”, “tactics”, “skill”, “luck”, and the imperative mood of the verb “gear” as used in “Gear the items that we use to help us sustain the fight and win the fight”, since every Latin noun  and verb must change the ending depending on the role in a sentence, i.e. subject, direct object, indirect object for the nouns, and mood, tense, person for the verbs.


That being stated,  here are the translations of the nouns  “mindset”, “tactics”, “skill” , “luck” and the verb “gear” which however can be  used only in the context that you mention:

-“Mindset” (noun),just in the sense  of the sentence  “The fighting Mindset to win a fight ”, translates as “pugnax animus”  (nominative masculine singular, 1st declension for “animus”; 3rd declension for the adjective “pugnax”) used  only as a subject of a sentence.

-“Tactics” (noun), just in the sense  of the sentence  “Using proper Tactics would be the skillful manipulation of time and distance to create an advantage “, translates as “ars militaris” (nominative feminine singular, 3rd declension noun + adjective) used only as a subject of a sentence.

-“Skill “ (noun), just in the sense  of the sentence  “Having the proper Skill set to execute the movements that make tactics possible”, translates as “peritia” (nominative feminine singular, 1st declension noun) used only as a subject of a sentence.


-“Gear” (verb, imperative, 2nd person singular), just in the sense  of the sentence  “Gear the items that we use to help us sustain the fight and win the fight”, translates as “para” (2nd person singular, imperative of the verb “paro”) used only as an imperative mood, 2nd person singular.

-“Luck “ (noun), just in the sense  of the sentence  “The Luck to survive or win the fight”, translates as “fortuna” (nominative feminine singular, 1st declension noun ) used only as a subject of a sentence.

As you can see, Latin modifies every word according to its role in a sentence so that it is not useful to know the nominative case of a noun or the infinitive of a verb , if you do not know Latin grammar and syntax and then are able to use nouns and verbs correctly.

Best regards,
Maria  

Latin

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Maria

Expertise

I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

Education/Credentials
I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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