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Latin/translation of a phrase to Latin

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Question
Hi Maria,

I would love to have a translation to Latin of a phrase. I would like it to begin just like the famous Terence quote "Homo sum", but my phrase goes, instead "I'm human, but only because I can't help it". I know it sounds despondent, but that's how I feel about humans.

Regards,

Héctor

Answer
Hello,

though your phrase sounds really despondent, it however can be translated as follows:

-“Homo sum, modo quia nihil de hac  re facere possum “
(literally, “I’m human, only because I cannot do anything  about this fact”)

Or:

-“Homo sum, modo quia id per me omnino non stat“
(literally, “I’m human, only because this fact is not at all up to me” or "I’m human, only because this fact does not depend at all on me").

Both translations are correct and then you can choose the one you like better.

Read more below.

Best regards,

Maria
________________________________________________________
Note that:

-I'm= SUM
-human = HOMO
-but only = MODO
-because = QUIA
-I can't help = NIHIL FACERE POSSUM or PER ME OMNINO NON STAT
-it =DE HAC RE (ablative of subject-matter/theme ) or ID (subject of the verb STAT)

As you can see, Latin word order can be different from English because Latin is an inflected language where grammatical/syntactical relationships are indicated by the ending of the words, not by their order. Therefore it is not necessary to adhere to a strictly defined order, since the knowledge of grammar makes everyone able to understand the role of a word in a sentence.

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin Language and Literature and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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