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Dear Maria,
Can you help me with the following? They are all from Seneca’s Epistles.

1. sic animo, qui adhuc tenuior est igne, per omne corpus fuga est. (LVII.8)
The case of “animo” is not clear.

2. praeteri illum nullo genere posse (LVII.9)
Could you give a literal translation?

3. Scio, inquam, et voluptatem, si ad nostrum album verba derigimus (LIX.2)
What is “album”?

4. ut non temerarias ita quae periculum sui fecerint (LIX.6)
Could you give a literal translation?

Thank you.
Robert

Answer
Dear Robert,

1.In “…sic animo, qui adhuc tenuior est igne, per omne corpus fuga est...”(Seneca, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium, LVII.8) the case of “animo” is a dative singular just like “fulmini” in the previous part of the sentence, since “Quomodo fulmini, ……per exiguum foramen est reditus, sic animo, qui adhuc tenuior est igne, per omne corpus fuga est” literally means:
”In the same manner as (quomodo) to the  lightning (fulmini, dative singular of “fulmen”)….. the return (reditus, subject)[to the heaven] happens (est)through a narrow opening (per exiguum foramen), so (sic) to  the soul (animo, dative of Possession. See AG 373)  which (qui)  is (est) still (adhuc) subtler  (tenuior) than fire (igne, ablative of comparison) , the escape (fuga, subiect)  happens (est) through any part of the body (per omne corpus)”: hence Gummere’s translation “...so the soul, which is still subtler than fire, has a way of escape..” where the dative “animo” becomes the subject (the soul)  and the verb “est” becomes “has”, as in e.g."Est mihi liber" meaning "I have a book".

2. “…Hoc .. certum habe: si superstes est corpori, praeteri  illum nullo genere posse….”(LVII.9) literally means:”… Reckon (habe) certain (certum)  this (hoc): [the fact that] , if  [the soul] survives (si…superstes est) the body (corpori, dative depending on “superstes”), it ( illum, i.e. the soul, which the subject of the object-clause depending on “certum habe”) can (posse) in no way (nullo genere) be destroyed (praetĕri, present infinitive passive of “praetĕro”. Please note however that Latin “praetĕri” may or may not be the correct form, since in other manuscripts we read “obtĕri”, as a different lection .Anyway both “praetĕri” and “obtĕri” are present infinitive passive  and mean “be destroyed”)…”.



3. In “Scio,... et voluptatem, si ad nostrum album verba derigimus, rem infamem esse …” (LIX.2) the neuter noun  “album” in the accusative singular depending on “ad” refers to Stoic vocabulary (see LIX,1 “ad significationem Stoicam”), i.e. to the use of the words according to the philosophical school of Stoicism, and literally means “white tablet” just like the praetor's edict, which was posted publicly on a white tablet,i.e. “ album”(neuter noun derived from the adjective "albus"= white").

So, “Scio, ...et voluptatem, si ad nostrum album verba derigimus…” literally means:” I know (scio) ,... that even (et/etiam)pleasure (voluptatem, subject of the object-clause) is (esse) an infamous (infamem) thing (rem), if (si) we conduct (derigimus) the words (verba) toward (ad) our (nostrum) [Stoic] vocabulary (album)…”, i.e.: “I really know that, if we make the words conform to our Stoic language,  even pleasure is an infamous thing…”.


4. Here’s the literal translation of “…Invenio tamen translationes verborum ut non temerarias ita quae periculum sui fecerint (LIX.6):
” Anyway (tamen) I find (invenio) versions (translationes) of words (verborum) [that are] not so ( ut non ) audacious (temerarias) like (ita) those that (quae) cause  (fecerint) danger (periculum) of themselves (sui, genitive of the 3rd person pronoun)…”, i.e. “Anyway I find some audacious  metaphors which however are not so dangerous…..”

Best regards,
Maria

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Maria

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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