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Anatoli wrote at 2011-01-20 15:52:41
"Peregrinus expectavi, pedes meos in cymbalis" is a poetic expression, so a literal translation doesn`t make much sense here. A possible interpretation is something like: Foreigner I come, the land is clanging under my feet( cymbals stay as metaphor for the ice of the Lake Peipus(Chudsko lake).  


borivac wrote at 2016-08-30 11:18:43
Peregrinus expectavi pedes meos in cymbalis est! Vincent arma crucifera! Hostis pereat! Latin



Cruiser is expected he is playing the cimbalom with his feet! Vincent`s weapon is crucifixion! The enemy is loosing! English



Крсташ се очекује, ноге му свирају цимбало! Винсентово оружије је распеће! непријатељ је изгубио! Serbian


borivac wrote at 2016-08-30 12:08:12
Peregrinus expectavi pedes meos in cymbalis est! Vincent arma crucifera! Hostis pereat! Latin



Crusader is expected he is playing the cimbalom with his feet! Vincent`s weapon is crucifixion! The enemy is loosing! English



Krstaš se očekuje, nogama svira cimbalo! Vinsentovo oružije je raspeće! Neprijatelj gubi! Serbian




borivac wrote at 2016-08-30 18:52:56
There is a sense, try to understand way of thinking of medieval warriors in the middle of battle or during marches, slogans needed to be simple, religious and transparent like "Roma Victor" or "For king and fatherland" or so.

Peregrinus expectavi pedes meos in cymbalis est! Vincent arma crucifera! Hostis pereat! Latin

Expecting crusader who is playing the cimbalom with his feet! Vincent`s weapon is crucifixion! The enemy is perishing! English

Explanation: First sentence -  Crusader is is so skillful  that he can play instrument with legs and carry sword with arms, Second sentence - Crucifixion is so strong symbol that Vincent (some warrior or priest) does not even need the weapon, Third sentence - The enemy is losing battle or dies probably like sort of propaganda in particular situation, something like "Fire at will" or "Steady, hold position"




Maria wrote at 2016-09-02 08:43:20
Thank you to everyone who has added a follow-up, but I’d like to point out that I was asked as an expert in Latin, not in musicology,  and then my remarks had to do with Latin language:hence the hypothesis regarding “cymbalum”(ablative plural,“cymbalis”) meaning “cymbal”, i.e. a percussion instrument, and “cymbulis” from ‘cymbula' (ablative plural,“cymbulis”) meaning ‘small vessel', not so strange in this context.

So, as an expert in Latin, I have to say that in “ Peregrinus expectavi pedes meos in cymbalis est! Vincent arma crucifera! Hostis pereat! “ the verb “est” in the 3rd person singular  is wrong, for it makes no sense at all  here so that it   seems to be an incorrect addition, while the correct translation for “Vincent arma crucifera! Hostis pereat!” is “The arms of the cross will be victorious! May the enemy  perish!”

In short, if the correct sentence sounded as “Peregrinus expectavi pedes meos in cymbulis ! Vincent arma crucifera! Hostis pereat!”, it  would literally  mean :” As a pilgrim I waited, with my feet in small boats! The arms of the cross will be victorious! May the enemy  perish!”.

Note that “vincent”(3rd person plural whose subject is “arma crucifera”)  is a future, while “pereat”(3rd person singular, whose subject is “hostis”)  is a hortatory subjunctive.

To conclude, I’d like to repeat that my answer has to do with Latin, not with musicology and any other discussion regarding Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky.

Best regards,

Maria


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Maria

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