You are here:

Locksmithing/Globe safe with an Eagle lock


I have an older globe class C safe with an eagle lock. The plate on the safe says underwriters laboratories inspected safe class c no. S-3575. On the lock knob it is engraved Eagle with a large letter B on the handle with the numbers 5 2 0 6 under the letter. I have been given this safe and the combination is no where to be found. I'm just trying to gather as much info about the safe as I can so that I might be able to open it and use it or just have it for decoration. Also it has four wheels on the bottom that are built as part of the safe. Oddly none of them pivot. They all face the same way as to move it in only straight lines.


I'm not sure why you would think it is odd to have "non-swiveling" wheels on a safe?   First consider that the safe does not just sit still and do nothing - it has a door which can easily weigh up to 1/3 the weight of the safe, which opens and closes.   Owners also don't stack their gold or pennies logically, which means that you could easily have more weight on one side than the other.
If the wheels "swiveled" easily, then a simple shift in the weight of the safe, could easily cause the center of gravity to move, allowing a wheel which WAS supporting the weight of the safe to pivot to a point that the safe could easily fall over.   The taller the safe the more affect that this would have or apply to the movement of the safe.
By having NON-swiveling wheels, you don't have a chance for any unwanted or unexpected movement or shift in balance, the wheels maintain their position at all times.

The full name of the company was "The Globe-Wernicke Company", Grand Rapids, MI.   This company manufactured safes from 1911 until around 1917 when they ceased manufacturing after losing several lawsuits over patent infringement and copying of safes made by the Safe Cabinet Company, their goal was to intentionally mislead customers into thinking that they were buying safes which WERE manufactured by the Safe Cabinet Company.   Globe-Wernicke was finally forced into receivership in 1932 due to the Great Depression.   It emerged from receivership in 1934 and continued until it acquired Weis Manufacturing Company and the name was changed to Globe-Weis in 1963.   After several other mergers, Globe-Weis became part of Cardinal Brands in 2000.

There are no records available which list any serial numbers or combinations which may have been set by the factory.   The Eagle lock generally used on these containers was a model 2058, which had the capability of around 15,500 possible combinations, using approximately every 4th number, with wheels # 1 & 3 being even (2-98 every fourth number) and wheel #2 being odd (3-99 every fourth number).   The dialing sequence would be:

4 times left to the first number,
3 times right to the second number,
2 times left to the third number,
1 time right until the dial stops (around 19).

Note:   Left is counter clockwise, Right is clockwise.   Do not count the revolutions of the dial, count the individual number as it arrives at the 12 o'clock index mark.

If you can't dial it open, then you will need to have a safe technician from a local safe company open the safe for you.

Warning:   This company was known to use asbestos as an insulation material, so it is considered a "HAZMAT" material.   Check your local ordinances to see what your responsibilities and/or liabilities might be.

Hope this helps,  


All Answers

Answers by Expert:

Ask Experts


Terry V. Andreasen (Andy)


Safe and Vault related Questions; Antique Safe Repair and Restoration; With over 40 years in the Safe & Vault industry, if I can't answer your question I know where to get the answer. Current Project: Restoration of two Tilton & McFarland safes from the 1860's. Will answer Safe & Vault related questions concerning age, value, restoration, moving, opening & repairing, parts, operation and history. Note: It is not my intention to teach you to open safes or to provide information which may aid in the unlawful opening of a safe. I will not give out drill points or information which I deem inappropriate.


40 years in the Safe & Vault Industry. Service Manager for one of the largest Safe & Vault companies on the West Coast. Graduate of Lockmasters Safe Lock Servicing, Safe lock Manipulation and Safe Deposit Lock Courses. Graduate of Locksmith Institute. Certified Instructor for the California Locksmith Association teaching Basic and Advanced Lock Servicing, Basic Safe opening and Repairing. Factory Trained by AMSEC, LORD Safes, LeFebure, Mosler, KabaMas, LaGard and Sargent & Greenleaf

SafeCrackers International and the National Antique Safe Association

Graduate of Locksmith Institute 1972 Graduate Lockmasters Safe Lock Servicing 1974 Graduate Lockmasters Safe Lock Manipulation 1975 Graduate Lockmasters Safe Deposit Lock Servicing 1985 Instructor Certified - California Locksmith Association - 1985 Factory trained by AMSEC, MAJOR, STAR, Johnson-Pacific, Kaba-MAS, Allied-Gary, ISM, Lord, Brown Safe, EXL, Mosler, Diebold.

Awards and Honors
2009 - 2014 - Listed in AllExperts Top 50 Experts. All Expert Categories - Safes & Security Containers, Locksmithing, Antique Safes. Retired US Army Chief Warrant Officer (CW4), with 39 years of total service. With numerous awards from Vietnam, Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom. US Navy - 1971-1981 US Army Reserve 1984-2013 US Army Retired

Past/Present Clients
US Secret Service, FBI, BATF, Local Law enforcment agencies, Diebold, Hamilton Pacific, Red Hawk Int., Chubb International, Bank of America, Wells Fargo Bank, Mechanics Bank, El Dorado Savings Bank, many Credit unions and smaller banks. McDonalds, Togos, BurgerKing, TacoBell, Carls Jr. FoodMaxx, SaveMart, Lucky's, Albertson's, Raley's, Safeway, NobHill, Bell Markets, PW Markets. Great America, Century Theatres, Cinemark Theatres, UA Cinemas, and many homeowners and small businesses. Provide warranty service for lock and safe manufactures. Service Area is Northern California (Fresno to Oregon and Western Nevada)

©2016 All rights reserved.