Management Consulting/MS-24

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Question
Dear Sir

Pls Ans the following Question. If You do this it will be great help for me. Thanks in Advance.

1) Discuss the meaning and content of the grievance. Explain various approaches of grievance resolution. Describe the approach of grievance resolution in any organisation you are familiar with. In your opinion whether the approach is effective or not. Discuss.



Thanks in Advance

Krishna

Answer
5]Discuss the meaning and content of the grievance. Explain various approaches of grievance resolution. Describe the approach of grievance resolution in any organisation you are familiar with. In your opinion whether the approach is effective or not. Discuss.


GRIEVANCE HANDLING
Purposes of the Grievance Procedure:
The primary purposes of a grievance procedure are to:
(1) channel conflict into an institutionalized mechanism for peaceful resolution;
(2) facilitate communication between labor and management regarding problems that arise in a collective bargaining relationship;
(3) enable employees to complain with dignity knowing that there is a system of appeals leading to an impartial decision-maker; and
(4) enforce compliance with the terms and conditions negotiated by the parties.

Handling Employee Grievance:
The following checklist is provided as guidance when an employee comes to you with a complaint:
CHECKLIST FOR HANDLING EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS:
PREREQUISITES:
-Know the contract.
-Make sure that meetings with employees to handle complaints are held in accordance with any contract provisions that regulate the time and/or location for such meetings.
-Develop good listening and note taking skills.
-Be prepared to spend the time to get the evidence and testimony to support your case and to refute management's case.
-Treat all employees fairly and consistently.
-Do not make judgments about the case to the employee or anyone else until you get the facts.
-Keep good records of all transactions, oral and written, that occur from the time a complaint is brought to you until the case is resolved in the grievance procedure or in arbitration.
-Know who, when and how to ask for help.

INTERVIEW:
-Let the employee tell his/her story without interruption. Take notes. When the employee has finished, ask, "Is there anything else you would like to add?"
-Review the employee's description of the case with him/her to make sure you have all the facts. Make sure you get the answers to the questions who, what, when, where, why and how.
-Ask the employee for the names, addresses and telephone numbers of any witnesses. Then ask the employee to tell you what he/she thinks each witness knows about the case. Record this information. Try to clarify any uncertainties about what a witness is supposed to know.
-Ask the employee to give you all of the evidence he/she has concerning the case. Make copies so that no information is lost.
-Before the employee leaves, check one more time to make sure you have all the facts, names of witnesses and evidence.

REVIEW:
-Refer to the grievance procedure in the contract to make sure the issue the employee has raised is defined as a proper subject of a grievance. If you are uncertain, ask for help. If the issue is not a proper subject of a grievance, the best thing to do is to tell the employee and explain how this affects his/her case.
-Check to make sure that the procedural requirements set forth in the grievance procedure have been complied with.
Key considerations include:
-Is the complaint timely?
-Who should the employee and/or union representative meet with at the first step?
-What information must be presented by both parties at the first step?
-Review the contract provisions alleged to have been violated to make sure they fit the issue described by the employee and that no provisions have been left out.
-Review the evidence. Go through all the documents the employee has given you. Make sure everything is dated and signed. Carefully check the content of each document to find out what it actually states, if this information pertains to the case and is timely. Check for inconsistencies in the documents and between the documents and the information the employee has given you. Make a list of all inconsistencies. Check to see if the documents contain the names of other potential witnesses that the employee did not mention and/or that might be called by management. Make a list of these persons and find out how to contact them.
-Find out is there is any other evidence, e.g., rules and regulations, past grievances and arbitration decisions, past practice, documents in the employee's personnel file that he/she may not have, etc., that have a bearing on the case as viewed by both the union and the employer. Request documents from the employer as appropriate, in a timely fashion and in writing.
-Match the evidence you have with the list of potential witnesses. Make a list of questions to ask each witness when you interview them. Be sure to include at the end of each list the questions, "Is there anything else you would like to add?" and "Do you know of any other witnesses?"
-Interview witnesses. Apply the guidelines as set forth in II. Also, carefully check the following things as you consider what witnesses state that they know about the case:
-Does the witness have direct personal knowledge about what happened or is his/her knowledge based only on hearsay (i.e., second hand)?
-Is the witness credible (i.e., able to give a reasonable explanation about the events, and an honest, accurate accounting even if this means revealing negative things about his/her record/conduct)?
-Does the witness' statement confirm what the employee has said, or are there differences/inconsistencies?
-Does the witness have any reason to be less than truthful in stating what he/she knows about the case?
-If there is more than one witness who knows about a given event, note which ones would be best able to present clear testimony under the pressure of examination and cross-examination at an arbitration hearing.
-Verify name, address, telephone, work shift and location.

ANALYSIS:
After you have thoroughly reviewed all of these matters, you may find that a complaint is not grievable/arbitrable or that the case lacks merit. One way to proceed is to explain your findings to the employee and ask if there is any additional information he/she has that might have a bearing on the case. If not, you should be guided by local or international union policy and perhaps by counsel, in determining how to handle this situation. Grievances lacking merit should be screened out to conserve a union's resources for other cases. This can be done by committee in consultation with an international representative or counsel. This determination should be made with care because unions have a legal duty to fairly represent all employees in the bargaining unit whether or not they are union members.
-Can you account for any inconsistencies in the case and, if so, how?
-Are there any mitigating circumstances that could explain the employee's behavior and thus lessen or remove any disciplinary action?
-Does the evidence and testimony the union has demonstrate one or all of the following:
-Disparate treatment;
-Arbitrary and capricious action; and/or Discrimination.
-Are there any past practices which pertain to the case and, if so, how?
-Does the evidence and testimony the union has support the remedy requested or should some modification be made in that remedy?
-Do you have hard evidence and testimony based upon direct personal knowledge to support your case or is your case largely based upon circumstantial evidence?
-Is the remedy requested reasonable or is it nonsensical, outside the scope of the employer's or of an arbitrator's authority to grant? Would it be impossible to implement even if granted, etc.?
-Is the contract provision(s) you are relying upon modified by more specific language in the provision or elsewhere in the contract?
-Where rules and regulations are concerned, have they been posted and given to employees, are they reasonable and have they been fairly, consistently and equitably enforced?
-What has been the outcome of other similarly situated cases? Does this information help or hurt your case? How?
Once you have reviewed and analyzed all these considerations with respect to the union case, prepare a summary of what you think the employer's response will be and determine if you have a sound rebuttal for each of the points the employer could raise.

FILING:
Be sure to properly and timely complete the grievance form. This includes such items as: names; dates; signatures; clear and accurate statement of the complaint; contract clauses alleged to have been violated; and remedy requested.
This is a checklist, not a magic wand. It highlights key points to consider in handling employee complaints. This task is time consuming and requires the application of a number of skills. There are no real short cuts. If you take them, an employer will usually find them at some stage in the grievance procedure or in arbitration. The result may be very damaging involving not only loss of a case that might have been won, but also expenditures of time, other resources and credibility that a union can ill afford.
Handling Discipline and Discharge Cases:
In all likelihood, most of the grievances you handle will involve discipline or discharge. Since management is the party that took the action, (i.e., is the moving party) the BURDEN OF PROOF is on the employer to show that it has just cause for such action. This means that, in arbitration, management must go first in showing what evidence and testimony it has to support the action taken. A union then responds with the evidence and testimony it has in defense of the grievant and as rebuttal to the case presented by the employer. There are 7 commonly accepted tests for just cause. These are:
1. If a rule is alleged to have been violated, was that rule reasonable?
2. Was the grievant given adequate notice that the conduct
complained about was improper?
3. Was the alleged offense sufficiently investigated?
4. Was the investigation fair?
5. Was the misconduct proved?
6. Did the employee receive equal treatment with all others who have
committed a similar offense? If not, were there any mitigating
circumstances?
7. Was the penalty appropriate for the offense committed?
Refer back to the Checklist for Handling Complaints to remind yourself of the type of information you must collect to support a complaint in a discipline or discharge case. Remember to find out: who; what; when; where; why; and how. Collect all of the evidence and interview witnesses, then review and analyze these in relation to the 7 tests listed above. This will give you an idea of the strength of support for the union's case. Remember, you must also consider what evidence and testimony management may be able to present and assess your case accordingly.

Contract Interpretation Cases:
These cases involve disputes over the interpretation of contract language. Unlike discipline and discharge cases, the party that claims the contract language has been improperly interpreted has the burden to go forward in presenting its case. Critical to prevailing in a contract interpretation case can be: evidence obtained from the bargaining history of the parties (what have they done in the past, for how long, and what was the intent at the bargaining table); and have any past practices developed that have changed the meaning of that contract language. The tests for a binding past practice are that the practice must be: (1) unequivocal; (2) clearly enunciated and acted upon; and (3) readily ascertainable over a reasonable period of time as a fixed, and established practice accepted by both parties. Mutual acceptance may be tacit, however, an implied mutual agreement determined by inference from the circumstances. It is very important in contract interpretation cases that you obtain witnesses who were actually at the bargaining table when the disputed language was agreed to, and/or have direct knowledge that the language has been rolled over in successive contracts without dispute for a period of years, or of past practices that have changed the meaning of the disputed language. In such cases, the kinds of proof that can be critical to support either party's case may include:
Copies of past contracts;
Notes from bargaining sessions;
-Other documentation that will prove how the language has actually been Implemented (e.g., other arbitration awards);
-Employees with long service that can testify about how a contract provision has been implemented;
-Whether the disputed language is clear and unambiguous on its face;
-is general language limited by more specific language in the same provision or elsewhere in the contract;
-Are the disputed terms being interpreted in normal language or as they usually are in your business or is the interpretation strained;
Will upholding your position or that of management produce a nonsensical or unworkable result?
======================================================================
the grievance procedure and practice in your organisation and present a brief report.
  The organisation  I  am   referring to
  
  The  organization, I am  familiar  with  is  a
  -a  large  manufacturer/ marketer of  safety products
  -the products  are  used  as  [personal  protection safety] [ industrial  safety]
  -the products  are  distributed through  the distributors as well as  sold directly
  -the  products  are  sold  to various  industries like  mining/fireservices/defence/
  as  well  as  to  various  manufacturing  companies.
  -the  company employs  about  235  people.
  -the  company  has  the following  functional   departments
  *marketing
  *manufacturing
  *sales
  *finance/ administration
  *human resource
  *customer  service
  *distribution
  *warehousing/  transportation
  *TQM  
  


COMPANY POLICY
COMPANY .................. aims to resolve problems and grievances promptly and as close to the source as possible with graduated steps for further discussions and resolution at higher levels of authority as necessary.

Statement of General Principles
1   Complaints must be fully described by the person with the grievance
2   The person(s) should be given the full details of the allegation(s) against them
3   The person(s) against whom the grievance/complaint is made should have the opportunity and be given a reasonable time to put their side of the story before resolution is attempted
4   Proceedings should be conducted honestly, fairly and without bias
5   Proceedings should not be unduly delayed.


PROCEDURES
The following is a four level process:

1.   The Employee attempts to resolve the complaint as close to the source as possible.
This level is quite informal and verbal

If the matter is not resolved

2.   The Employee notifies the Supervisor (in writing or otherwise) as to the substance of the grievance and states the remedy sought.
Discussion should be held between employee and any other relevant party.
This level will usually be informal, but either party may request written statements and agreements.
This level should not exceed one week.

If the matter is not resolved

1.   The Supervisor must refer the matter to the Manager (or Board of Directors if applicable).
A grievance taken to this level must be in writing from the employee.
The Supervisor will forward to the Manager any additional information thought relevant
The Manager will provide a written response to the Employee
The Manager also communicate with any other parties involved or deemed relevant.
This level should not exceed one week following the next scheduled meeting.

  If the matter is not resolved

2.   The Employee will be advised of his/her rights to pursue the matter with external authorities if they so wish.

THE  POLICY  IS  VERY  EFFECTIVE  IN THIS  ORGANIZATION  DUE  THE
METHODS OF BRINGING CONFLICT TO SURFACE

1. Grievance procedure
2. Direct observation
3. Suggestion boxes
4. Personal counselor
5. Exit interviews
6. Miscellaneous channels


GREIVANCE

(A) Dissatisfaction is any state or feeling of discontent

(B) Dissatisfaction orally made known by one employee to another is a complaint.

(C) A complaint becomes a grievance when brought to the notice of the management.

According to Fillipo, “The term would include any discontent and dissatisfaction that affects organizational performance. It can either stated or unvoiced, written or oral, legitimate or ridiculous.
(a) A complaint is a discontent that has not assumed importance.
(b) A complaint becomes grievance when the employee feels that injustice has been committed.


CHARACTERISTICS OF GRIEVANCES

(i) It may be unvoiced or expressly stated.
(ii) It may be written or oral
(iii) It may be valid, legitimate or untrue or false.
(iv) It may relate to the organizational work.
(v) An employee may feel an injustice has been done.
(vi) It may affect the performance or work.

Grievances generally give rise to unhappiness, frustration, indifference, discontent, poor morale, and poor efficiency THAT IS CHANGE IN ATTITUDE, PERCEPTION AND BEHAVIOR.


TYPES OF GREIVANCE

(a) Visible grievances
(b) Hidden grievances

An employee may feel that there has been an infringement of his rights.

Grievances exist in the minds of individuals.

Grievances may be concerning employment, working conditions, change of service conditions, biased approach, non-application of principle of natural justice, work loads and work norms.


NEED FOR GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

(i) Identification and analysis of grievances, nature nod causes.
(ii) Helps at formulating and implementing the policies and programmes.
(iii) It is problem solving, dispute-settling mechanism.
(iv) Strengthen good industrial relationship.
(v) It detects the flaws in working conditions and helps to take corrective measures.
(vi) Build good morale, maintains code of discipline.
(vii) Brings uniformity in handling grievances.
(viii) It develops faith of employees.
(ix) Reduces personality conflicts.
(x) It acts as a pressure valve.
(xi) Provides judicial protection to the employees.
(xii) Provides avenues to present the problems.


GRIEVANCE REDRESSAL SYSTEM

Enables the parties to resolve differences in peaceful, orderly and expeditious manner.

Enables the parties to investigate and discuss the problem
(i) Open-door policy
(ii) Step ladder type
(iii) Grievance handling committee


BASIC ELEMENT OF GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

1. Existence of sound channel.
2. The procedure should be simple, definite and prompt.
3. It should be clearly defined.
4. Helpful attitude of management.
5. Fact-oriented system.
6. Respect for decisions.
7. Adequate publicity.
8. Periodic Review.


STEPS IN HANDLING GRIEVANCES

1. Receive and define the nature of dissatisfaction.
(a) Manner and attitude when complaint is received
(b) Assessment must be made that the complaint is presented fairly.
(c) Statement and issues must not be pre-judged.
(d) Proper time and attention is given.

2. Get the facts
(a) Facts be separated from impressions and opinions.
(b) Consult the policies.
(c) Consult the records.

3. Analyze and decide.

4. Apply the answer.

5. Follow-up


DO’S IN HANDLING GRIEVANCES

1. Investigate and handle each case carefully

2. Talk to the employee.

3. Enforce the time limit.

4. Visit the work area or place of grievance.

5. Determine witnesses.

6. Examine records.

7. Examine witnesses.

8. Evaluate grievance.

9. Permit full hearing.

10. Identify the relief an employee is expecting.

11. Command the respect of all.

12. All discussions privately.

13. Keep superiors informed.

14. Ensure proper productivity.

15. Stick to labor agreements.

GRIEVANCE HANDLING:
Purposes of the Grievance Procedure:
The primary purposes of a grievance procedure are to:
(1) channel conflict into an institutionalized mechanism for peaceful resolution;
(2) facilitate communication between labor and management regarding problems that arise in a collective bargaining relationship;
(3) enable employees to complain with dignity knowing that there is a system of appeals leading to an impartial decision-maker; and
(4) enforce compliance with the terms and conditions negotiated by the parties.

Handling Employee Grievance:
The following checklist is provided as guidance when an employee comes to you with a complaint:
CHECKLIST FOR HANDLING EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS:
PREREQUISITES:
-Know the contract.
-Make sure that meetings with employees to handle complaints are held in accordance with any contract provisions that regulate the time and/or location for such meetings.
-Develop good listening and note taking skills.
-Be prepared to spend the time to get the evidence and testimony to support your case and to refute management's case.
-Treat all employees fairly and consistently.
-Do not make judgments about the case to the employee or anyone else until you get the facts.
-Keep good records of all transactions, oral and written, that occur from the time a complaint is brought to you until the case is resolved in the grievance procedure or in arbitration.
-Know who, when and how to ask for help.

INTERVIEW:
-Let the employee tell his/her story without interruption. Take notes. When the employee has finished, ask, "Is there anything else you would like to add?"
-Review the employee's description of the case with him/her to make sure you have all the facts. Make sure you get the answers to the questions who, what, when, where, why and how.
-Ask the employee for the names, addresses and telephone numbers of any witnesses. Then ask the employee to tell you what he/she thinks each witness knows about the case. Record this information. Try to clarify any uncertainties about what a witness is supposed to know.
-Ask the employee to give you all of the evidence he/she has concerning the case. Make copies so that no information is lost.
-Before the employee leaves, check one more time to make sure you have all the facts, names of witnesses and evidence.

REVIEW:
-Refer to the grievance procedure in the contract to make sure the issue the employee has raised is defined as a proper subject of a grievance. If you are uncertain, ask for help. If the issue is not a proper subject of a grievance, the best thing to do is to tell the employee and explain how this affects his/her case.
-Check to make sure that the procedural requirements set forth in the grievance procedure have been complied with.
Key considerations include:
-Is the complaint timely?
-Who should the employee and/or union representative meet with at the first step?
-What information must be presented by both parties at the first step?
-Review the contract provisions alleged to have been violated to make sure they fit the issue described by the employee and that no provisions have been left out.
-Review the evidence. Go through all the documents the employee has given you. Make sure everything is dated and signed. Carefully check the content of each document to find out what it actually states, if this information pertains to the case and is timely. Check for inconsistencies in the documents and between the documents and the information the employee has given you. Make a list of all inconsistencies. Check to see if the documents contain the names of other potential witnesses that the employee did not mention and/or that might be called by management. Make a list of these persons and find out how to contact them.
-Find out is there is any other evidence, e.g., rules and regulations, past grievances and arbitration decisions, past practice, documents in the employee's personnel file that he/she may not have, etc., that have a bearing on the case as viewed by both the union and the employer. Request documents from the employer as appropriate, in a timely fashion and in writing.
-Match the evidence you have with the list of potential witnesses. Make a list of questions to ask each witness when you interview them. Be sure to include at the end of each list the questions, "Is there anything else you would like to add?" and "Do you know of any other witnesses?"
-Interview witnesses. Apply the guidelines as set forth in II. Also, carefully check the following things as you consider what witnesses state that they know about the case:
-Does the witness have direct personal knowledge about what happened or is his/her knowledge based only on hearsay (i.e., second hand)?
-Is the witness credible (i.e., able to give a reasonable explanation about the events, and an honest, accurate accounting even if this means revealing negative things about his/her record/conduct)?
-Does the witness' statement confirm what the employee has said, or are there differences/inconsistencies?
-Does the witness have any reason to be less than truthful in stating what he/she knows about the case?
-If there is more than one witness who knows about a given event, note which ones would be best able to present clear testimony under the pressure of examination and cross-examination at an arbitration hearing.
-Verify name, address, telephone, work shift and location.

ANALYSIS:
After you have thoroughly reviewed all of these matters, you may find that a complaint is not grievable/arbitrable or that the case lacks merit. One way to proceed is to explain your findings to the employee and ask if there is any additional information he/she has that might have a bearing on the case. If not, you should be guided by local or international union policy and perhaps by counsel, in determining how to handle this situation. Grievances lacking merit should be screened out to conserve a union's resources for other cases. This can be done by committee in consultation with an international representative or counsel. This determination should be made with care because unions have a legal duty to fairly represent all employees in the bargaining unit whether or not they are union members.
-Can you account for any inconsistencies in the case and, if so, how?
-Are there any mitigating circumstances that could explain the employee's behavior and thus lessen or remove any disciplinary action?
-Does the evidence and testimony the union has demonstrate one or all of the following:
-Disparate treatment;
-Arbitrary and capricious action; and/or Discrimination.
-Are there any past practices which pertain to the case and, if so, how?
-Does the evidence and testimony the union has support the remedy requested or should some modification be made in that remedy?
-Do you have hard evidence and testimony based upon direct personal knowledge to support your case or is your case largely based upon circumstantial evidence?
-Is the remedy requested reasonable or is it nonsensical, outside the scope of the employer's or of an arbitrator's authority to grant? Would it be impossible to implement even if granted, etc.?
-Is the contract provision(s) you are relying upon modified by more specific language in the provision or elsewhere in the contract?
-Where rules and regulations are concerned, have they been posted and given to employees, are they reasonable and have they been fairly, consistently and equitably enforced?
-What has been the outcome of other similarly situated cases? Does this information help or hurt your case? How?
Once you have reviewed and analyzed all these considerations with respect to the union case, prepare a summary of what you think the employer's response will be and determine if you have a sound rebuttal for each of the points the employer could raise.

FILING:
Be sure to properly and timely complete the grievance form. This includes such items as: names; dates; signatures; clear and accurate statement of the complaint; contract clauses alleged to have been violated; and remedy requested.
This is a checklist, not a magic wand. It highlights key points to consider in handling employee complaints. This task is time consuming and requires the application of a number of skills. There are no real short cuts. If you take them, an employer will usually find them at some stage in the grievance procedure or in arbitration. The result may be very damaging involving not only loss of a case that might have been won, but also expenditures of time, other resources and credibility that a union can ill afford.
Handling Discipline and Discharge Cases:
In all likelihood, most of the grievances you handle will involve discipline or discharge. Since management is the party that took the action, (i.e., is the moving party) the BURDEN OF PROOF is on the employer to show that it has just cause for such action. This means that, in arbitration, management must go first in showing what evidence and testimony it has to support the action taken. A union then responds with the evidence and testimony it has in defense of the grievant and as rebuttal to the case presented by the employer. There are 7 commonly accepted tests for just cause. These are:
1. If a rule is alleged to have been violated, was that rule reasonable?
2. Was the grievant given adequate notice that the conduct
complained about was improper?
3. Was the alleged offense sufficiently investigated?
4. Was the investigation fair?
5. Was the misconduct proved?
6. Did the employee receive equal treatment with all others who have
committed a similar offense? If not, were there any mitigating
circumstances?
7. Was the penalty appropriate for the offense committed?
Refer back to the Checklist for Handling Complaints to remind yourself of the type of information you must collect to support a complaint in a discipline or discharge case. Remember to find out: who; what; when; where; why; and how. Collect all of the evidence and interview witnesses, then review and analyze these in relation to the 7 tests listed above. This will give you an idea of the strength of support for the union's case. Remember, you must also consider what evidence and testimony management may be able to present and assess your case accordingly.

Contract Interpretation Cases:
These cases involve disputes over the interpretation of contract language. Unlike discipline and discharge cases, the party that claims the contract language has been improperly interpreted has the burden to go forward in presenting its case. Critical to prevailing in a contract interpretation case can be: evidence obtained from the bargaining history of the parties (what have they done in the past, for how long, and what was the intent at the bargaining table); and have any past practices developed that have changed the meaning of that contract language. The tests for a binding past practice are that the practice must be: (1) unequivocal; (2) clearly enunciated and acted upon; and (3) readily ascertainable over a reasonable period of time as a fixed, and established practice accepted by both parties. Mutual acceptance may be tacit, however, an implied mutual agreement determined by inference from the circumstances. It is very important in contract interpretation cases that you obtain witnesses who were actually at the bargaining table when the disputed language was agreed to, and/or have direct knowledge that the language has been rolled over in successive contracts without dispute for a period of years, or of past practices that have changed the meaning of the disputed language. In such cases, the kinds of proof that can be critical to support either party's case may include:
Copies of past contracts;
Notes from bargaining sessions;
-Other documentation that will prove how the language has actually been Implemented (e.g., other arbitration awards);
-Employees with long service that can testify about how a contract provision has been implemented;
-Whether the disputed language is clear and unambiguous on its face;
-is general language limited by more specific language in the same provision or elsewhere in the contract;
-Are the disputed terms being interpreted in normal language or as they usually are in your business or is the interpretation strained;
Will upholding your position or that of management produce a nonsensical or unworkable result?
======================================================================
the grievance procedure and practice in your organisation and present a brief report.

COMPANY POLICY
COMPANY .................. aims to resolve problems and grievances promptly and as close to the source as possible with graduated steps for further discussions and resolution at higher levels of authority as necessary.

Statement of General Principles
Complaints must be fully described by the person with the grievance
The person(s) should be given the full details of the allegation(s) against them
The person(s) against whom the grievance/complaint is made should have the opportunity and be given a reasonable time to put their side of the story before resolution is attempted
Proceedings should be conducted honestly, fairly and without bias
Proceedings should not be unduly delayed.


PROCEDURES
The following is a four level process:

The Employee attempts to resolve the complaint as close to the source as possible.
This level is quite informal and verbal

If the matter is not resolved

The Employee notifies the Supervisor (in writing or otherwise) as to the substance of the grievance and states the remedy sought.
Discussion should be held between employee and any other relevant party.
This level will usually be informal, but either party may request written statements and agreements.
This level should not exceed one week.

If the matter is not resolved

The Supervisor must refer the matter to the Manager (or Board of Directors if applicable).
A grievance taken to this level must be in writing from the employee.
The Supervisor will forward to the Manager any additional information thought relevant
The Manager will provide a written response to the Employee
The Manager also communicate with any other parties involved or deemed relevant.
This level should not exceed one week following the next scheduled meeting.

If the matter is not resolved

The Employee will be advised of his/her rights to pursue the matter with external authorities if they so wish.
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