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Question
Case 1:

Rajesh Varma a Delhi businessman, was quite impressed when during his visit to
Japan he found factory hands working to the accompaniment of soft music which was
piped through the public address system. He was quite determined to introduce this
‘modem innovation’ in his factory at Vapi and did so immediately on his return from
his foreign tour.
He however forgot that the machines in his factory were old and noisy. Moreover as
the factory hands would like only film music it was this that was blared through the
loud speakers.
The result of the modern innovation were instantaneous — decrease in efficiency and
fall in production as the foremen and supervisors could hardly talk to the workers no
could the workers communicate with one another or concentrate on their own.

Question:
(1) Explain the three physical barriers that are commonly encountered in the communication process.

Case 2:

Congress (I) - 1989 Election Campaign
The Congress (I) campaign at the 1989 general election in India makes an interesting
case study where the party’s communication and performance created a dissonance
among its public at a critical juncture. This may not be a purely PR case on the face of
it, but it does involve PR activity behind the scenes in an otherwise visible advertising
campaign. As you know elections are fought on may other turfs, not just in or through
an advertising campaign.
Congress (I)’s losing the elections was actually a failure of its all—round PR effort.
And this case can be used as a good example to analyse the communications failure in
particular, rather than the whole gamut of party policies and strategies.

Questions:
(1) Which are the target audience.
(2) What could be PR strategy/action plan.
(3) What may be the out come

Case 3:

HIDDEN AGENDA
The Managing Director of Roltex Company called a meeting of senior executives once
in every fifteen days. For severals months he failed to understand why the meetings got
bogged down and progress was not made.
Then he began to listen to the hidden agenda and discovered why the meetings were
not successful. The new materials manager Mr. Anil D’Souza had received his training
in the U.S.A. and he was greatly disliked by the other managers because of the
superior airs that he put on.
The other manager made it, a point to disagree with whatever Mr. Anil D’Souza said
even if his suggestions were for the good of the company. In the following meetings
the managing Director made it a point to see that Mr. Anil first agreed to the
suggestions made by the other managers before he put forward his own suggestions.
From then on the meetings were more cordial and thereafter much progress was made.

Questions:
(1) In the light of the above case explain the meaning of hidden agenda. How can the chairman tackle this problem.


Case 4:

The Image War Case:
General Motors assisted by a battery of PR professionals, lawyers and technical
personnel held a press conference in Detroit, USA on what is known as the ultimate
war of images. The GM wanted to counter and refute a story by the famous television
network NBC that claimed some of GM truck models were likely to explode in an
accident.
Earlier GM had been ordered to pay US 105.2 million dollars to the family of a man
who had died in the crash of a GM truck.
The automaker at its internal PR and external PR consultants rightly felt, was on a
firmer ground. The GM response was entirely based on the truth and understanding of
the situation that NBC story was motivated and concocted. They could not afford to
lose a battle that had so much to do with its image and identity.
NBC, on the other hand, knew the holes in their story and were caught in an awkward
situation. The network, although its own image was involved, admitted its fault in no
uncertain terms. In fact, NBC admitted that it had made false statements and had used
by rockets as igniters in staged crashes shown in its news story.
Questions:
(1) What conclusions can you draw from the above case?
(2) What lessons can you draw from the image war case?


Case 5:

(1) HPC Ltd.
Hindustan Paper Corporation (HPC) was set up in 1970 to help remove shortages in
the field of writing/printing paper and newsprint and to ensure that paper was
distributed in a rational and equitable manner. Although the company was started in
1970, the level of awareness about the company until as late as 1977 was extremely
low. A Market Research Group, who conducted a survey in four metro cities, found
out that awareness about HPC as a corporate entity was low and awareness of the
company’s activities was even lower. Thus, it was obviously impossible for a growing
company to build a market for its products or to attract the best talent into the
company.
To deal with the situation, it was felt that a corporate communication programme
should be designed and launched. The objective of this communication programme
would be:
(1) To create awareness about the existence of the company and the purpose for which
is had been established.
(2) To give it a recognizable identity.
(3) To give a sense of belonging to the employees and the internal public and
(4) To project an image of the organization amongst the external publics as one, which
was helping to ensure a fair distribution of vital but scarce commodity.
Utmost care was taken to develop and implement effective communication strategy to
achieve the said objectives.
An evaluation of the impact of the campaign was carried out by the Market Research
Group of HPC. It was confined to four metro cities. The findings were that the
Corporate Campaign had been successful ink increasing the level of awareness of HPC
and its activities.
However there was a rather unexpected fall out of the campaign. Since the basic
slogan of he campaign was “Don’t waste paper” and the campaign emphasized the fact
that with dwindling raw materials, there may not be enough paper in the coming years,
there was a rather panicky reaction in the trade as well as the media. Dealers tended to
hoard paper, and prices rose sharply. Newspaper reports referred to the speculative
hoarding by a section of the traders.

Questions:
(1) What do you mean by corporate identity and how it assists in building corporate
image?

Answer
Question:   Case 1:

Rajesh Varma a Delhi businessman, was quite impressed when during his visit to
Japan he found factory hands working to the accompaniment of soft music which was
piped through the public address system. He was quite determined to introduce this
‘modem innovation’ in his factory at Vapi and did so immediately on his return from
his foreign tour.
He however forgot that the machines in his factory were old and noisy. Moreover as
the factory hands would like only film music it was this that was blared through the
loud speakers.
The result of the modern innovation were instantaneous — decrease in efficiency and
fall in production as the foremen and supervisors could hardly talk to the workers no
could the workers communicate with one another or concentrate on their own.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Question:
(1) Explain the three physical barriers that are commonly encountered in the communication process.
Physical barriers

   The three physical barriers that are commonly encountered in the communication process are : Noise, Time and distance and faulty instruments.
   Noise or disturbance acts as a barrier          to communication
     Cross Connections
      Bell Rings in the classroom   
Radio Atmospheric noise
Trumphet, band, etc.

   Time : For Instance if a businessman wants to talk to a man in London whose office is closed due to the different time zones of the 2 countries.
   Distance: It is difficult to communicate between 2 people who are seated far away from each other.
   Defective Instruments: When the instruments of communication have a defect in them the communication process becomes difficult or impossible.
   eg. Defective computers, telephone, failure of electric power etc.
There are also some human physical defects such as stammer, bad hearing and a bad handwriting.

####################

Case 2:

Congress (I) - 1989 Election Campaign
The Congress (I) campaign at the 1989 general election in India makes an interesting
case study where the party’s communication and performance created a dissonance
among its public at a critical juncture. This may not be a purely PR case on the face of
it, but it does involve PR activity behind the scenes in an otherwise visible advertising
campaign. As you know elections are fought on may other turfs, not just in or through
an advertising campaign.
Congress (I)’s losing the elections was actually a failure of its all—round PR effort.
And this case can be used as a good example to analyse the communications failure in
particular, rather than the whole gamut of party policies and strategies.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Questions:
(1) Which are the target audience.
(2) What could be PR strategy/action plan.
(3) What may be the out come
(1) Which are the target audience.
Consider three target audiences: passionate liberals, passionate conservatives and normal people who vote. Those of us who fall in one of the first two groups, battle for market share of the third group. We want our ideas embraced. We want our candidates elected.
Paradoxically, the primary target audience for those of us passionate about politics is voters who are disengaged from politics. How do you reach this group? How do they form their opinions? Talk radio and the rest of the new media doesn’t reach these people or sway their opinions. The primary audience of talk radio is those of us who are passionate about politics and are committed to a political ideology. We are not normal.
Normal people don’t care as much about politics or liberal versus conservative ideology as they care about sports, hobbies, their jobs, family activities, etc. They are not interested in taking the time to understand issues on a deep level. They want sound bites and headlines. They want to glean information efficiently, form quick opinions and move onto something else more enjoyable.  
The target audience - people who swing elections and influence policy because of their answers to public opinion polls - is reached through the mainstream media. These people spend a few minutes with the newspaper and catch their local news on television. The claim that media bias is not a problem because conservatives now have a voice in the media misses the big picture perspective
----------------------------------------

(2) What could be PR strategy/action plan.
1.   What is your political campaign about (mission & vision)? What is your political campaign about (mission & vision)?
2.   What is your social and political environment?
3.   What is your competitive environment?
4.   What are your main political campaign goals?
5.   What is your political campaign strategy?
6.What are the individual (measurable) political campaign goals?
7.What are the timetables (deadlines) to accomplish political campaign goals?
8.How is your political campaign force organized (political campaign organization)?
9.What are your current political campaign activities?
10.What are your political campaign results (parameters)?
11.What are the phases of your political campaigning process?
12.What are the personal selling skills and experience of campaign staff?
13.Who are your stakeholders (who will cry if you die)?
14.Who are your strategic partners and strategic alliances?
15.How do you gather political campaign information (intelligence gathering)?
16.What are the information on your voters?
17.What are the information on your political market?
18.What are the information on your competition?
19.What are the information on your voter services?
20.How do you manage relations with your potential voters?
21.How do you manage relations with your existing voters?
22.How do you perform and manage voter services?
23.How do you measure-record your political campaign results?
24.What is your political campaign reporting (recording) system?
25.What is the SWOT analyses for your political campaign?
26.What is the SWOT analyses for your political party?
27.What is the marketing strategy of your political campaign?
28.How would you fulfill your political campaign goals?
29.How would you organize your political campaign force?
30.How would you measure and control the fulfillment of your campaign goals?
31.How would you carry out your political campaign support actions?
32.How would you establish strategic partnerships and alliances?
33.How would you gather political campaign information?
34.How would you carry out strategy and tactics of gaining new voters?
35.How would you create communication channels to new voters?
36.How would you carry out strategy and tactics of CRM (existing voters)?
37.What would be the steps of your political campaign process?
38.How would you create loyalty programs for your voters?
39.How would you plan and create your political campaign budget?
40.What would be your political campaign action plans (timetable)?
41.What is the action plan to create a political campaign management department?
42.What is the action plan to maintain your political campaign momentum?
43.How would you measure-record your political campaign results?
44.Who would control and how would you control political campaign action execution?
45.How would you evaluate your political campaign action plan execution?
(3) What may be the out come

45 questions + 45 right answers = election won + loyal voter base

######################

Case 3:

HIDDEN AGENDA
The Managing Director of Roltex Company called a meeting of senior executives once
in every fifteen days. For severals months he failed to understand why the meetings got
bogged down and progress was not made.
Then he began to listen to the hidden agenda and discovered why the meetings were
not successful. The new materials manager Mr. Anil D’Souza had received his training
in the U.S.A. and he was greatly disliked by the other managers because of the
superior airs that he put on.
The other manager made it, a point to disagree with whatever Mr. Anil D’Souza said
even if his suggestions were for the good of the company. In the following meetings
the managing Director made it a point to see that Mr. Anil first agreed to the
suggestions made by the other managers before he put forward his own suggestions.
From then on the meetings were more cordial and thereafter much progress was made.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$4
Questions:
(1) In the light of the above case explain the meaning of hidden agenda. How can the chairman tackle this problem.


If  you say that someone has a hidden agenda, you are criticizing them because you think they are secretly trying to achieve or cause a particular thing, while they appear to be doing something else
============
THIS  IS  ONE  APPROACH.
In the following meetings
the managing Director made it a point to see that Mr. Anil first agreed to the
suggestions made by the other managers before he put forward his own suggestions.
From then on the meetings were more cordial and thereafter much progress was made.

ANOTHER   APPROACH
THE  MANAGING  DIRECTOR   CAN   TAKE  UP
-treat  ANIL  like  other  managers.
-allow  ANIL   participate  as  usual
-then  the  managing  director  himself  explain  the  benefit  of  the  ANIL’S  SUGGESTIONS.
#######################
Case 4:

The Image War Case:
General Motors assisted by a battery of PR professionals, lawyers and technical personnel held a press conference in Detroit, USA on what is known as the ultimate
war of images. The GM wanted to counter and refute a story by the famous television
network NBC that claimed some of GM truck models were likely to explode in an accident.
Earlier GM had been ordered to pay US 105.2 million dollars to the family of a man
who had died in the crash of a GM truck.
The automaker at its internal PR and external PR consultants rightly felt, was on a
firmer ground. The GM response was entirely based on the truth and understanding of
the situation that NBC story was motivated and concocted. They could not afford to
lose a battle that had so much to do with its image and identity.
NBC, on the other hand, knew the holes in their story and were caught in an awkward
situation. The network, although its own image was involved, admitted its fault in no
uncertain terms. In fact, NBC admitted that it had made false statements and had used
by rockets as igniters in staged crashes shown in its news story.
Questions:
(1) What conclusions can you draw from the above case?
(2) What lessons can you draw from the image war case?

(1)   What conclusions can you draw from the above case?

THE  CONCLUSION
-there  is  clear   misunderstanding  of  the  events, between  the  TWO   GIANTS
-GM [ AUTO  INDUSTRY\
-NBC [ TELEVISION  MEDIA]
-----------------------------------

(2) What lessons can you draw from the image war case?
THE  LESSON
-when  there is  a  clear  misunderstanding

-the  two  parties  must  sit  together  and  clear  the  air  of  misunderstanding.

-as  this  incident  could   affect  the  credibility  and  image   of  the  parties.




#######################



Case 5:

(1) HPC Ltd.
Hindustan Paper Corporation (HPC) was set up in 1970 to help remove shortages in
the field of writing/printing paper and newsprint and to ensure that paper was
distributed in a rational and equitable manner. Although the company was started in
1970, the level of awareness about the company until as late as 1977 was extremely
low. A Market Research Group, who conducted a survey in four metro cities, found
out that awareness about HPC as a corporate entity was low and awareness of the
company’s activities was even lower. Thus, it was obviously impossible for a growing
company to build a market for its products or to attract the best talent into the
company.
To deal with the situation, it was felt that a corporate communication programme
should be designed and launched. The objective of this communication programme
would be:
(1) To create awareness about the existence of the company and the purpose for which
is had been established.
(2) To give it a recognizable identity.
(3) To give a sense of belonging to the employees and the internal public and
(4) To project an image of the organization amongst the external publics as one, which
was helping to ensure a fair distribution of vital but scarce commodity.
Utmost care was taken to develop and implement effective communication strategy to
achieve the said objectives.
An evaluation of the impact of the campaign was carried out by the Market Research
Group of HPC. It was confined to four metro cities. The findings were that the
Corporate Campaign had been successful ink increasing the level of awareness of HPC
and its activities.
However there was a rather unexpected fall out of the campaign. Since the basic
slogan of he campaign was “Don’t waste paper” and the campaign emphasized the fact
that with dwindling raw materials, there may not be enough paper in the coming years,
there was a rather panicky reaction in the trade as well as the media. Dealers tended to
hoard paper, and prices rose sharply. Newspaper reports referred to the speculative
hoarding by a section of the traders.

Questions:
(1) What do you mean by corporate identity and how it assists in building corporate
image?
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
What is corporate identity?
Corporate identity is the persona of the corporation. It is a set of values and principles held by the firm. And it is the way these values are communicated verbally, in writing, and graphically in the corporate logo, design and colors. You put all of these elements together and you get an image of the corporation - the corporate identity
If done well, the corporate identity provides a meaningful umbrella for the corporate brand, the set of products or services that the corporation offers and any endorser brands.
There are a number of ways a well-managed corporate identity can benefit you beyond building a corporate brand asset that helps to differentiate your products or services. It can create a tie to customers that share common or complementary values. It can enable new opportunities with potential partners that relate to the aspirations articulated by the identity. Internally, corporate identity can provide a platform that inspires employees. And a good corporate identity can also cut total marketing costs by leveraging marketing activities across products and divisions.
five key points on successfully managing corporate identity:
1. The personality of the corporation has to be captured completely and authentically. Starbucks claims to be environmentally conscious and this is reflected in its business. If Starbucks were to claim, “we’re about high fashion” it wouldn’t fit.
2. The identity should appear spontaneous. Again look at the Hilti logo. It is strong, bold, and looks at home on a construction site. Is that an accident? Of course not. It probably took many hours to get it right.
3. “Learning from Picasso to un-learn.” According to Mark Anderson a lot of people say something like, “we want a corporate identity like IBM but orange”. He tells them to go back to the drawing board, to unlearn all the things that are already out there, and to focus on their own company’s personality.
4. Be strong. Don’t wander from your corporate identity. Don’t put your name to a product or service that is not consistent with your identity, no matter how lucrative it might be.
5. Think broadly. Communicate your corporate identity in everything you do. Take Apple: identity is reflected in its products, its press releases, its people, and of course in the famous iconic logo.
Finally, set yourself a test. Can you distill your corporate identity into one or a handful of words? The key is to find words that are descriptive and meaningful, and will provide a good umbrella for all of the activities you undertake.
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Managing a Business

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Leo Lingham

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In Managing a business, I can cover all aspects of running a business--business planning, business development, business auditing, business communication, operation management, human resources management , training, etc.

Experience

18 years of working management experience covering such areas
as business planning, business development, strategic planning,
marketing, management services, personnel administration.

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24 years of management consulting which includes business planning, strategic planning, marketing, product management, training, business coaching etc.

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MASTERS IN SCIENCE

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