Managing a Business/ms-10

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Question
describe and discuss the trends in the present day work organisations and the role of management in quality of work life?

Answer
The Quality of Work Life (QWL) has assumed increasingly interest and importance in all the
countries of the World. It is very significant in the context of commitment to work, motivation and job performance. It is also means to facilitate the gratification of human needs and goal achievement. Work life naturally means the life of workers, physical and intellectual, in their work environment in office or factory or field-working. What is expected of the worker? What
are the conditions of the work place? What is the compensation that the worker gets? What are the incentives offered to him? How about his contentment with the work environment and the compensation? These are the questions to be tackled by the Researcher in any study of work life.
Quality of work Life is referred to as humanizing the working life and emphasizing the human factor. It mostly refers to favorableness’ or unfavourableness of a job environment for the people
involved in it. The basic objective is to develop jobs that are excellent for people as well as for
production. So we can see the basic questions of Quality Work Life….
What is Quality? “Quality is the ability of a product or service to consistently meet or
exceed customer expectations.
What is work? Work can be defined as the application of discretion within limits in order
to produce a result.
What is work life? Work life does not merely means the facilities provided to the
employees during office hours. It comprises of all the collusive feelings, which reside in the mind of the employee while he works in the organization, he is in the office or away from it.
MEANING OF QWL
Quality of work Life is a Person’s life. It covers a person’s feelings about every
dimension of work including economic rewards and benefits, security, working condition,
Organizational and interpersonal relations and its intrinsic meaning in person’s life. Therefore
we can simply say Q.W.L. is a concern not only to improve life at work, but also life outside
work.

To improve the standard of living of the employees.
To increase the productivity
To create a positive attitude in the minds of the employees.
To increase the effectiveness of the organization (profitability, goal accomplishment
etc.,)
After Industrial Revolution, the importance of human factor reduced because of the vast
mechanization. Various problems like job dissatisfaction, boredom, absenteeism, lack of
commitment etc came up.
Most management theories give emphasis on production, manipulating the skills of
employees.
eight major conceptual categories relating to
QWL as (1) adequate and fair compensation, (2) safe and healthy working conditions, (3)
immediately opportunity for continued growth and security, (4) Opportunity to use and develop
human capacities, (5) Social integration in the work organization, (6), Constitutionalism in the
work organization, (7), Work and total life space and (8), Social relevance of work life.

High Quality of work life there should be a positive impact on personal
life, an opportunity to be involved in decision as well as acceptable level of physical comfort.
“The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their commitment excellence, regardless
of their chosen field of endeavor.”
to what they described as psychological
growth needs as relevant to the consideration of Quality of working life. Several such needs were
identified: Skill variety, Task Identity, Task significance, Autonomy and Feedback. They
suggested that such needs have to be addressed if employees are to experience high quality of
working life.

Freedom and autonomy to make decision on the job
Satisfactory Physical surroundings
Job safety
Meaningful tasks.

Management
support ± particularly top management support appears to be an almost universal prerequisite for
successful QWL programs. By substantiating employee satisfaction and bottom-line benefits,
which range from lower absenteeism and turnover to higher productivity and fewer accidents, the
department can help convince doubting managers. The policies and practices of the department
also influence motivation and satisfaction indirectly. Rigorous enforced safety and health
programs, for example, can give employees and supervisors a greater sense of safety from
accidents and industrial health hazards. The motivation and satisfaction of employees act as
feedback on the organization’s QWL and on the department’s day-to-day activities.
MEASURES TO IMPROVE QWL
A) QWL THROUGH EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT (EI): One of the most common methods used
to create QWL is employee involvement. Employee involvement (EI) consists of a variety of
systematic methods that empower employees to participate in the decisions that affect them and
their relationship with the organization. Through (EI), employees feel a sense of responsibility,
even ³ownership´ of decisions in which they participate.
To be successful, however, EI must be more than just a systematic approach; it must become
part of the organization’s culture by being part of management’s philosophy. Some companies
have had this philosophy ingrained in their corporate structure for decades; Hewlett-Packard,
IBM, General Motors, Ford, etc.
B) QUALITY CIRCLES: Quality circles are small groups of employees who meet
regularly with their common leader to identify and solve work-related problems. They are a
highly specific form of team building, which are common in Japan and gained popularity in
North America in the late1970s and early 1980s. By the 1980s most medium- and large-sized
Japanese firms had quality control circles for hourly employees. This effort began as a quality
improvement program but has since become a routine procedure for many Japanese managers and
cornerstone of QWL efforts in many Japanese firms. Several characteristics make this approach unique.
First, membership in the circle involuntary for both the leader (usually the supervisor) and
the members (usually hourly workers). Secondly, the creation of quality circles is usually preceded by in-house
training. For supervisors these sessions typically last for two or three days. Most of the time is
devoted. to discussions of small-group dynamics, leadership skills, and indoctrination in the
QWL and quality circle philosophies. About a day is spent on the different approaches to
problem-solving techniques.
The workers also receive an explanation of the supervisor’s role as the group’s discussion
leader and information on the quality circle concept. Thirdly, as is pointed out in the training, the
group is permitted to select the problems it wants to tackle. Management may suggest problems
of concern, but the group is empowered to decide which ones to select. Ideally, the selection
process is not by democratic vote but is arrived at by consensus, whereby everyone agrees on the
problem to be tackled.
(If management has been pressing problems that need to be solved, these problems can be
handled in the same way that they were resolved before the introduction of quality circles).
When employees are allowed to select the problems they want to work on, they are likely to be
more motivated to find solutions. And they are also more likely to be motivated to stay on as
members of the circle and solve additional problems in the future.
C) SOCIO-TECHNICAL SYSTEMS: Another intervention to improve QWL is the use of
socio-technical systems. Socio-technical systems are interventions in the work situation that
restructure the work, the work groups, and the relationship between workers and the technologies
they use to do their jobs. More than just enlarging or enriching a job, these approaches may
result in more radical changes in the work environment.
D) AUTONOMOUS WORK GROUP: A more common, still rare, approach to employee
involvement is the use of autonomous work groups. These are teams of workers, without a
formal company-appointed leader, who decide among themselves most decisions traditionally
handled by supervisors. The key feature of these groups is a high degree of self-determination by employees
in the management of their day-to-day work. Typically this includes collective control over the
pace of work, distribution of tasks, organization of breaks, and collective participation in the
recruitment and training of new members. Direct supervision is often necessary.
QWL is more likely to improve as workers demand jobs with more behavioral elements.
These demands will probably emerge from an increasingly diverse and educated work force that
expects more challenges and more autonomy in its jobs ± such as worker participation
indecisions traditionally reserved for management.
The following ten tips are designed to get one thinking. They apply as much to the CEO as
they do to the front line worker:
1) HAVING A PERSONAL VISION -of who you want to be and what you want to do -
keep in mind that if you do not have one for yourself, you will likely become part of
someone else's vision!
2) TEST OUT ONE’S OWN PERSONAL VISION -with that of your organizations - in
how many ways do they support each other? Ask questions to better understand your
organization's mission, vision, and values.
3) LEARN, AND KEEP ON LEARNING -go training sessions and in-services, enroll in
college courses, read books. Know why, not just how.
4) BUDDY-UP -find ways to share the load with other team members. Sharing the load
makes work easier to manage and less stressful.
5) SHARE YOUR SUCCESSES-this allows you to learn from the successes of others, as
well as giving you a boost when you need
6) GET IT OFF YOUR CHEST- talk things over with your buddy, friend, supervisor when
things trouble you, don’t keep it bottled up inside.
7) FIND JOY IN BEING OF SERVICE TO OTHERS-think about how the person you are
serving is better off as a result of your work, rejoice n that knowledge.
8) TAKE TIME FOR BREAKS-pay particular attention to the need to refresh body, mind
and spirit.
9) TRY OUT NEW IDEAS- to innovate is to grow. By using your creativity and innovation
life becomes exciting and fulfilling.
10) HAVE FUN AT WORK - laughter is the best medicine, but use only appropriate
humor. Damaging someone else’s self esteem for the fun of it is no laughing matter.
======================================================



QWL services address the key areas of Work-Life Balance, Health Promotion and Wellness, and Staff Appreciation and Recognition.

WORK LIFE  BALANCE — Manage the competing demands of home and work.

FLEXIBLE  WORK OPTIONS offer creative solutions to help you balance work and family demands.

DAY  CHILD CARE  is available when  public schools close due to inclement weather (pre-enrollment required).

WORK AND FAMILY SERVICE provide support for dependent care issues, including school strikes, elder care challenges, and more.

EDUCATIONAL  WORKSHOPS cover a variety of topics, from finance to family relationships.

HEALTH  PROMOTIONS AND  WELLNESS— Improve your physical and emotional health and wellbeing.

EMPLOYEE  ASSISTANCE  PROGRAM provides free, 24/7 resources for you and your family, including counseling, referrals and information about personal or professional concerns.

ANNUAL  HEALTH  FAIRS held each year in April feature free health screenings and a wealth of information.

FLU  SHOTS  are available to faculty and staff every fall.

DISCOUNT  FITNESS  CLUB  PROGRAM  offers discounted memberships to local health clubs.

WELLNESS  WORKSHOPS explore nutrition, lifestyle, exercise and other health-related topics.

RECREATING  PROGRAM  provides group exercise classes, personal training, gym membership and more at attractive rates.

WALKING  PROGRAM makes walking, jogging or running a part of your routine by tracking your progress and keeping you motivated.

WEIGHT  REDUCTION  PROGRAMS helps members shed excess pounds with on-campus meetings.

WEIGHT  MAINTENANCE  gives you the support you need to avoid gaining weight during the holiday season.

SMOKING  CESSATION   PROGRAM can help you kick the habit.

STAFF RECOGNITION/ REWARDS Enjoy  recognition and appreciation of your contributions to Penn's mission.

 LENGTH  OF  SERVICE  REWARDS  reward long-standing commitment to Penn.

EXCELLENCE  AWARDS honor achievements by individuals or teams who go above and beyond the call of duty.

FAMILY   DAY  is an annual celebration of the Penn community, featuring food, fun and football.


Quality of Worklife programs are constantly evolving.  

=========================
WHAT ARE FLEXIBLE WORK OPTIONS
Flexible work options offer creative approaches for completing work while promoting balance between work and personal commitments. These approaches involve use of non-traditional work hours, locations, and/or job structures, flexible work arrangements, time worked does not equate to achieved outcomes. Outcomes are based on the staff member's achievement of results and use of competencies critical to achieving those results. Except in the case of conversion from full-time to a less-than-full time schedule, such as for a part-time assignment or job share, the total numbers of hours worked and expected productivity remain the same.
Typical flexible work options are:
FLEXTIME :The most requested, easiest to manage and the most affordable FWO, flextime offers flexibility in arrival, departure and/or lunch times, typically with a designated core-time mid-day during which all staff are present.

FLEXPLACE :This arrangement allows for a portion of the job to be performed off-site, on a regular, recurring basis. The majority of work time is spent at the office and the off-site work typically is done at home. It may be the most complicated flexible work option to arrange since it generally requires electronic equipment and technological support.

COMPRESSED  WORK  SCHEDULE :A traditional 35-40 hour work week is condensed into fewer than five days of work. This option is more easily applied to non-exempt (weekly paid) staff for whom maximum work hours are identified, but it is not ruled out for monthly paid staff who may work more than 40 hours during the work week. The Fair Labor Standards Act requires weekly paid staff to be paid overtime if they work over 40 hours in a work week.

PART-TIME  WORK ---is a regular arrangement for between 17.5 and 28 hours a week. This is different from a temporary work assignment where an employee is expected to have a temporary, non-recurring relationship to the workplace and does not receive paid time off.


JOB-SHARING : allows two staff members to share the responsibilities of one full-time position, typically with a prorated salary and paid time off. This is not the same as a part-time job. Each staff member shares a specific proportion of a full-time position. Creative and innovative schedules can be designed to meet the needs of the job sharers and the office. Note: If one position is scheduled for less than 17.5 hours a week, it becomes temporary and cannot retain regular part-time status.
===============================

Creating an Employee Supportive
Workplace . Achieving Work-Life  Quality and Balance

Work-Life quality and balance have become the most pressing
issues experienced by workers today. This program is based
upon the premise that we cannot manage time but we can
manage our most important workplace activities, when they are
clearly identitified and prioritized.

Achieving work-life quality and balance requires the
complementary efforts of:
• An Organizational Support System
and implementation of:
• Manager/Supervisor/Employee-Designed Work-Life Process

The Organizational Support System consists of:
. Program support
. Leadership support
. Cultural Transformation

The Manager/Supervisor/Employee Designed Work-Life
Process consists of:
• Personal Work-Life Plan
• Implementation Process


Creating an Employee Supportive Workplace
Achieving Work-Life Quality and Balance
An Organizational Support System

Program Support: This component involves the various unique
programs offered by an organization to their employees. These
programs include, but are not limited to:
1. Family-Friendly Initiatives
2. Child Care
3. Elder Care
4. Adoption
5. Family Leave
6. New Mothers
7. Family Education Expenses
8. Employee Assistance Programs
9. Personal Problems
10. Financial, Mental, Health, and Chemical Dependency
11. Work-friendly Programs
12. Flexibility in Work Hours
13. Telecommuting or working at home
14. Zero Tolerance Harassment (including race, color, sex, etc.)
15. Disability and Religious Accommodation
16. Anti-harassment Training, Prevention, and Procedures
17. Pay Equity Evaluations and Adjustments
18. Employee Satisfaction Survey
19. Disability Strategy
20. Retirement Planning Program
         
Creating an Employee Supportive Workplace
Achieving Work-Life Quality and Balance
26. On-site summer camp
27. Workshops or seminars for quality, balance, and work-life issues
28. Diversity training
29. Manager/supervisor work-life appraisals
30. Career counseling programs
31. Wellness programs for employees and their families
32. 401(k) or 403(b) individual retirement plan
21. Reduced schedules
22. Family leave for childbirth or adoption
23. Job sharing
24. Leave for school/childcare functions
25. Childcare near or at worksite


=================================================
What are work/life balance initiatives?
Simply put, work/life balance initiatives are any benefits, policies, or programs that help create a better balance between the demands of the job and the healthy management (and enjoyment) of life outside work.
Work/life initiatives can potentially deal with a wide range of issues including:
•   on-site childcare,
•   emergency childcare assistance,
•   seasonal childcare programs (such as March break or Christmas),
•   eldercare initiatives (may range from referral program, eldercare assessment, case management, a list of local organizations or businesses that can help with information or products, or seminars and support groups),
•   referral program to care services, local organizations, etc.,
•   flexible working arrangements,
•   parental leave for adoptive parents,
•   family leave policies,
•   other leaves of absence policies such as educational leave, community service leaves, self funded leave or sabbaticals,
•   employee assistance programs,
•   on-site seminars and workshops (on such topics as stress, nutrition, smoking, communication etc),
•   internal and/or external educational or training opportunities, or
•   fitness facilities, or fitness membership assistance (financial).
-------------------------------------------------------------
Why should a workplace consider these programs?
The need for balance is essential.
When employees are "out of balance", they experience more stress and fatigue and tend to be absent from work more often due to these reasons. They have less focus while at work because they are worried about issues at home and they are also more distracted at home because work matters weigh on their minds. The end result is that neither situation is healthy or productive; in short, it's a lose/lose situation for employees, their families and their employer.
Studies on work/life balance programs have reported such benefits as:
•   Attracts new employees,
•   Helps to retain staff,
•   Builds diversity in skills and personnel,
•   Improves morale,
•   Reduces sickness and absenteeism,
•   Enhances working relationships between colleagues,
•   Encourages employees to show more initiative and teamwork,
•   Increases levels of production and satisfaction, and
•   Decreases stress and burn-out.
----------------------------------------------------------
How does a workplace implement work/life balance initiatives?
Work/life balance initiatives can be part of a complete health and safety and/or a health promotion program in the workplace. The initiatives can be written as part of existing health and safety policy, or particular guidelines can be referenced in the overall company human resources policy or the collective agreement (if applicable).
Meeting both the employees' and overall business needs requires a significant commitment from senior management. Each workplace should tailor its work/life policies to suit their own particular needs and corporate culture. This 'best fit' should be done with frequent consultation with employees. As with other health and safety programs, for work/life initiatives to be successful and sustainable, both employers and employees must take responsibility for making the program work effectively. An evaluation or feedback systems should also be part of that process.
It is very important to remember that for many workers balancing work/life demands is just one of the many challenges they face on a regular basis. While most people would agree that these issues should be addressed, they may not know where they can be resolved. A program dealing with work/life issues could, for example, be part of a complete health and safety program. However, it should not take away resources or distract attention from addressing other health and safety concerns or hazards that may be present in the workplace.
------------------------------------------------------------------
What are some steps to take when setting up a program?
When starting, it is best to appoint an individual or in some cases, form a joint work/life committee. To research needs and to implement the program, suggested steps to take are as follows:
1. Assess the workplaces' current situation and objectives.
•   Survey employees, supervisors, and managers.
•   Ask about needs, concerns, etc. Find out about bottom line or underlying concerns (e.g., employees report not being able to cope with workplace stress. What is the true source of this stress?)
2. Get buy-in from all levels. Educate all members of the company about the benefits and challenges of introducing these programs. Be clear on the intentions and goals of the program. Provide any necessary training and/or education to help these address concerns.
Some common concerns or challenges that may need to be addressed include the misconceptions that:
•   people should keep their personal lives at home,
•   being present equals being productive/ hours at work equals performance/results,
•   benefit programs can make people happier, but not more productive,
•   family-friendly policies are soft human resources issues, mainly for women,
•   management will lose control,
•   it's only for non-managerial positions,
•   one program is good for everyone, or
•   participation will be a career-limiting move.
3. Be clear how hours, productivity and deadlines will be monitored. Address fears and apprehension expressed by both employees and managers. Be sure that workload issues are resolved and set realistic targets.
4. Create a policy or guideline:
•   Clearly state its use and purpose.
•   Be clear about the impact on vacation time, compensation and other benefits, if any.
5. Initiate a trial period and/or pilot studies.
6. Monitor, re-survey, and make any adjustments that are necessary.
•   Act on recommendations for modification or for further enhancements.
======================================================================
The  organization, I am  familiar  with  is  a
-a  large  manufacturer/ marketer of  safety products
-the products  are  used  as  [personal  protection safety] [ industrial  safety]
-the products  are  distributed through  the distributors as well as  sold directly
-the  products  are  sold  to various  industries like  mining/fireservices/defence/
as  well  as  to  various  manufacturing  companies.
-the  company employs  about  235  people.
-the  company  has  the following  functional   departments
*marketing
*manufacturing
*sales
*finance/ administration
*human resource
*customer  service
*distribution
*warehousing/  transportation
*TQM  
---------------------------------------------------------------
OFFERS  THE  FOLLOWING  QWL  PROGRAMS

Flexible work options offer creative approaches for completing work while promoting balance between work and personal commitments. These approaches involve use of non-traditional work hours, locations, and/or job structures, flexible work arrangements, time worked does not equate to achieved outcomes. Outcomes are based on the staff member's achievement of results and use of competencies critical to achieving those results. Except in the case of conversion from full-time to a less-than-full time schedule, such as for a part-time assignment or job share, the total numbers of hours worked and expected productivity remain the same.
Typical flexible work options are:
FLEXTIME :The most requested, easiest to manage and the most affordable FWO, flextime offers flexibility in arrival, departure and/or lunch times, typically with a designated core-time mid-day during which all staff are present.

FLEXPLACE :This arrangement allows for a portion of the job to be performed off-site, on a regular, recurring basis. The majority of work time is spent at the office and the off-site work typically is done at home. It may be the most complicated flexible work option to arrange since it generally requires electronic equipment and technological support.

COMPRESSED  WORK  SCHEDULE :A traditional 35-40 hour work week is condensed into fewer than five days of work. This option is more easily applied to non-exempt (weekly paid) staff for whom maximum work hours are identified, but it is not ruled out for monthly paid staff who may work more than 40 hours during the work week. The Fair Labor Standards Act requires weekly paid staff to be paid overtime if they work over 40 hours in a work week.

PART-TIME  WORK ---is a regular arrangement for between 17.5 and 28 hours a week. This is different from a temporary work assignment where an employee is expected to have a temporary, non-recurring relationship to the workplace and does not receive paid time off.


JOB-SHARING : allows two staff members to share the responsibilities of one full-time position, typically with a prorated salary and paid time off. This is not the same as a part-time job. Each staff member shares a specific proportion of a full-time position. Creative and innovative schedules can be designed to meet the needs of the job sharers and the office. Note: If one position is scheduled for less than 17.5 hours a week, it becomes temporary and cannot retain regular part-time status.
===============================
Quality of work life (QWL) is viewed as an alternative to the control approach of managing people. The QWL approach considers people as an ‘asset’ to the organization rather than as ‘costs’. It believes that people perform better when they are allowed to participate in managing their work and make decisions.

This approach motivates people by satisfying not only their economic needs but also their social and psychological ones. To satisfy the new generation workforce, organizations need to concentrate on job designs and organization of work. Further, today’s workforce is realizing the importance of relationships and is trying to strike a balance between career and personal lives.

Successful organizations support and provide facilities to their people to help them to balance the scales. In this process, organizations are coming up with new and innovative ideas to improve the quality of work and quality of work life of every individual in the organization. Various programs like flex time, alternative work schedules, compressed work weeks, telecommuting etc., are being adopted by these organizations.

Technological advances further help organizations to implement these programs successfully. Organizations are enjoying the fruits of implementing QWL programs in the form of increased productivity, and an efficient, satisfied, and committed workforce which aims to achieve organizational objectives. The future work world will also have more women entrepreneurs and they will encourage and adopt QWL programs.

people say
'I like my job, I have wonderful kids and a supportive spouse, but I feel that I am stretched to the limit. I never seem to have enough hours in the day to get my work done and still have time for family let alone friends or the things I really want to do'.
They are not alone. High levels of stress are often associated with conflicting demands of work and home. Even though job satisfaction may be high, a majority of workers rate balancing work and family as more important that any other employment factors. One of the greatest challenges to balancing work and home life is job demands. Job demands include "time pressures and deadlines, long hours, unclear or conflicting duties, having too much responsibility, or work that is too tiring or boring".
Work/life balance initiatives can help to bridge the gap between work and home responsibilities.
---------------------------------------------------
work/life balance initiatives
Simply put, work/life balance initiatives are any benefits, policies, or programs that help create a better balance between the demands of the job and the healthy management (and enjoyment) of life outside work.
Work/life initiatives can potentially deal with a wide range of issues including:
•   on-site childcare,
•   emergency childcare assistance,
•   seasonal childcare programs (such as March break or Christmas),
•   eldercare initiatives (may range from referral program, eldercare assessment, case management, a list of local organizations or businesses that can help with information or products, or seminars and support groups),
•   referral program to care services, local organizations, etc.,
•   flexible working arrangements,
•   parental leave for adoptive parents,
•   family leave policies,
•   other leaves of absence policies such as educational leave, community service leaves, self funded leave or sabbaticals,
•   employee assistance programs,
•   on-site seminars and workshops (on such topics as stress, nutrition, smoking, communication etc),
•   internal and/or external educational or training opportunities, or
•   fitness facilities, or fitness membership assistance (financial).
-------------------------------------------------------------
workplace consider these programs
The need for balance is essential.
When employees are "out of balance", they experience more stress and fatigue and tend to be absent from work more often due to these reasons. They have less focus while at work because they are worried about issues at home and they are also more distracted at home because work matters weigh on their minds. The end result is that neither situation is healthy or productive; in short, it's a lose/lose situation for employees, their families and their employer.
Studies on work/life balance programs have reported such benefits as:
•   Attracts new employees,
•   Helps to retain staff,
•   Builds diversity in skills and personnel,
•   Improves morale,
•   Reduces sickness and absenteeism,
•   Enhances working relationships between colleagues,
•   Encourages employees to show more initiative and teamwork,
•   Increases levels of production and satisfaction, and
•   Decreases stress and burn-out.
----------------------------------------------------------
workplace implement work/life balance initiatives
Work/life balance initiatives can be part of a complete health and safety and/or a health promotion program in the workplace. The initiatives can be written as part of existing health and safety policy, or particular guidelines can be referenced in the overall company human resources policy or the collective agreement (if applicable).
Meeting both the employees' and overall business needs requires a significant commitment from senior management. Each workplace should tailor its work/life policies to suit their own particular needs and corporate culture. This 'best fit' should be done with frequent consultation with employees. As with other health and safety programs, for work/life initiatives to be successful and sustainable, both employers and employees must take responsibility for making the program work effectively. An evaluation or feedback systems should also be part of that process.
It is very important to remember that for many workers balancing work/life demands is just one of the many challenges they face on a regular basis. While most people would agree that these issues should be addressed, they may not know where they can be resolved. A program dealing with work/life issues could, for example, be part of a complete health and safety program. However, it should not take away resources or distract attention from addressing other health and safety concerns or hazards that may be present in the workplace.
------------------------------------------------------------------
steps to take when setting up a program
When starting, it is best to appoint an individual or in some cases, form a joint work/life committee. To research needs and to implement the program, suggested steps to take are as follows:
1. Assess the workplaces' current situation and objectives.
•   Survey employees, supervisors, and managers.
•   Ask about needs, concerns, etc. Find out about bottom line or underlying concerns (e.g., employees report not being able to cope with workplace stress. What is the true source of this stress?)
2. Get buy-in from all levels. Educate all members of the company about the benefits and challenges of introducing these programs. Be clear on the intentions and goals of the program. Provide any necessary training and/or education to help these address concerns.
Some common concerns or challenges that may need to be addressed include the misconceptions that:
•   people should keep their personal lives at home,
•   being present equals being productive/ hours at work equals performance/results,
•   benefit programs can make people happier, but not more productive,
•   family-friendly policies are soft human resources issues, mainly for women,
•   management will lose control,
•   it's only for non-managerial positions,
•   one program is good for everyone, or
•   participation will be a career-limiting move.
3. Be clear how hours, productivity and deadlines will be monitored. Address fears and apprehension expressed by both employees and managers. Be sure that workload issues are resolved and set realistic targets.
4. Create a policy or guideline:
•   Clearly state its use and purpose.
•   Be clear about the impact on vacation time, compensation and other benefits, if any.
5. Initiate a trial period and/or pilot studies.
6. Monitor, re-survey, and make any adjustments that are necessary.
•   Act on recommendations for modification or for further enhancements.
==================================================
##########################################  

Managing a Business

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In Managing a business, I can cover all aspects of running a business--business planning, business development, business auditing, business communication, operation management, human resources management , training, etc.

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