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Mrs. Gibbs wrote at 2009-02-18 19:18:48
In the play, "Our Town" by Thornton Wilder, Mrs. Gibbs makes the comment "Look at that moon will you! Tsk, Tsk, Tsk! Potato weather, for sure."



There must be some significance. I found your site while trying to find the significance


Jen wrote at 2009-03-13 14:36:10
I've also been on the hunt for the meaning of that line.  (I'm directing a production of Our Town right now.)  Between the internet, the script and the actress playing my Mrs Gibbs we've figured out that it *must* be spring and either a full or waning moon.

Potatoes are best planted in cool weather and (if you following moon phasing) when the moon is moving from full to new.  

Following the script, both heliotrope (short blooming phase that is over by summer) and roses (Old Garden Roses arrive in late spring, early summer) are in bloom.

It's likely as well that the spring season is an analogy referring not only to the beginning of the show but also life in general (birth is referenced many times in Act I.)

So yes, in the context of Our Town its like that Mrs Gibbs is referring to the full moon and the cool air.


Albert wrote at 2014-11-27 19:13:33
The 2 phrases  in question are kind of metaphors, country people is superstitious, so the "tsk, tsk, tsk" corresponds to the believing that if you tap wood three times, you can break  the spell or invocation, that you make when you mention the expresion of "potatos weather"  that refers to the believing that the buried (and by analogy the potatos), wander in nigths of full moon. Thorton loved the folk's customs including the sayings, and he wanted them to inmortalize them in his novels.  


Albert wrote at 2014-11-27 19:31:20
The 2 phrases in question are kind of metaphors, country people is superstitious, so the "tsk, tsk, tsk" corresponds to the believing that if you tap wood three times, you can break the spell or invocation, that you make when you mention the expresion of "potatos weather" that refers to the believing that the buried (and by analogy the potatos), wander in night of fullmoon. Thornton Wilder loved the folk's customs including the fears and sayings, and he wanted them to be immortalized in this play.


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