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Mice/Orphan baby deer mouse and hantavirus

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Question
QUESTION: My cat had this baby mouse so i took it away. I am not sure what kind it is. It is dark grey with white on stomach. Its eyes are not opened yet. Have been trying to bottle feed it kitten formula. What kind of mouse do I have? Should I keep it? If so what should I feed it? What are chances of it carrying diseases?

ANSWER: Hi Lee,

A dark grey mouse is a house mouse, which is good because they don't carry anything you can get (the only thing any house or fancy mouse could give you is ringworm, and I have never heard of that in a wild mouse).

Do keep it, if it survives. My best advice is to watch the series of ten short videos at the addy in my profile (sorry I can't link it; I am on my iPad).

The mouse should definitely be fed every TWO hours *around the clock*. Kitten milk is fine. Other than that, all the information is in there.

If it survives, you will have a simply wonderful pet. Hand raised mice are awesome.

Squeaks n giggles,

Natasha


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Cheese
Cheese  
QUESTION: This  is "Cheese".  Wanted to send you this picture to make sure he is a house mouse.

Answer
Hi Lee, Hi Cheese!

What a cutie. However, look at those little white feet. If makes me suspect a white-footed deer mouse. His coat may change into the lighter agouti later. Field mice also generally (always?) have white tummies, whereas house mice don't.

So, your question will be again, can he carry anything you can catch?

It is hugely, hugely unlikely. There is an illness called hantavirus that field mice can give humans. This is how I explained it to another questioner:

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Mice-3824/2012/4/keep-wild-field-mouse.htm

And another questioner:

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Mice-3824/2008/8/wild-baby-won-t.htm


Now, something reassuring. Mother mice do NOT give it to their babies by nursing. That's about all I have been able to figure out about the mouse part of it. I have tried writing to the cdc and other places, and I cannot get answers-- for instance, I want to know exactly what the circumstances were of each of the 556 cases in the last 20 years-- has it ever been transmitted through a bite? How do the mice spread it among themselves? I am not getting answers.


Good luck to adorable little Cheese!

squeaks,

Natasha

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Natasha

Expertise

I can answer questions about raising mice and caring for them as pets, with knowledge from my 38 years of having fancy mice as pets. I have NO MEDICAL TRAINING and you should take a sick mouse to the vet; but if you simply can't, I will try to help you. I LOVE PHOTOS!!! I ALSO LOVE UPDATES! Let me know how the little tyke is doing later on, for better or worse, especially orphans. It also helps me to help the next person. Please first search first: use 'Natasha Mice Mouse' with whatever else your question includes. Or check out these links: **** YOUR FIRST MOUSE (my video; rough draft): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNK4uqNZTbA&feature=share **** TEN VIDEOS ON RAISING ORPHANS: http://www.youtube.com/user/CreekValleyCritters/videos?query=raising **** SEXING MICE: http://www.thefunmouse.com/info/sexing.cfm **** And some GREAT MOUSE INFO SITES: http://thefunmouse.com/info/index.cfm http://www.rmca.org/Resources/mousefaq.htm

Experience

I have had mice for 40 years (since I was 5!). I raised them when I was a child but now I keep all females, and never fewer than three so that if one dies the others are not devastated, because they have each other.

Organizations
I run Rats and Mice are Awesome on Facebook. The official name is Rats are Awesome.

Education/Credentials
B.A., M.A., M.A. in Linguistics: Yale University and University of Connecticut

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