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QUESTION: Hi,

I own a similar mouse as the one about which a question was posted earlier. He has a red bump in the middle of his spinal area, nearly in the exact same spot as one previous person posted. It was mentioned that it's likely a wart. Is that still the consensus?

Thank you expert,
I appreciate your response.

ANSWER: Hi Denis,

I'm sorry, I'm not sure which question you mean.  Is there any way you could get a photo of your mouse's bump and ask me a followup question with it attached, so I could give you a better response?  Bumps can be several different things, so it'd help me out a lot.  If you can't, you can just give me a link to the question so I can see what you are talking about, but a picture would be best if possible.

-Tam

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: http://en.allexperts.com/q/Mice-3824/2013/4/raised-red-bump-mouse.htm

The link is above, and the spot on my mouse is pretty much exactly in the same place as the mouse in that link. Now it has been a few days and it's no longer red. It's more like dark brown or black, and it seems to be smaller. I would have to check again as I am not home often enough.

Thank you for responding by the way!

Answer
Denis,

No wonder I didn't remember the question - Natasha answered it!  :)  I see that she didn't come to any other conclusions although she couldn't confirm what the spot was.  That makes sense, as we are not vets and can't see the bump in person or do a skin scraping to test for parasites or infections.

The fact that it has lessened in redness and shrunk makes me think it is probably more likely an injury like a scratch or a bug bite that has since started to heal.  Warts are of course possible, but so are pimples, bug bites, environmental irritants, mites, lice, allergies, scratches...you get the idea.  Without a vet visit the only thing we can do is try to narrow it down. Since it is healing on its own, I would consider just letting it do its own thing for now, and if you see it worsen, then consider rubbing something on it like an antibiotic ointment to help keep it clean as it heals.

If there is anything else I can help with please let me know!
-Tam

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Tamarah

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I can answer questions regarding mice as pets, mouse behavior, color and coat genetics, breeding techniques, and general health questions. I can help with caging and setup, nutrition, social issues, and what to do in most mouse emergencies (such as unplanned litters, injuries, fighting, etc.). I can also assist with questions pertaining to orphaned mouse pups, weaning litters, and questions of mating and birthing. I cannot answer questions about exotic or wild varieties of mice such as spiny or pygmy mice. *****FOR EMERGENCIES, anything requiring immediate medical intervention, PLEASE take your mouse to a professional veterinarian or wildlife rehabilitator who works with mice as soon as possible! IMPORTANT RESOURCES: Raising Orphaned Mice: http://www.rmca.org/Articles/orphans.htm Orphaned Mice Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/CreekValleyCritters/videos?query=raising Natasha's Your First Mouse: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNK4uqNZTbA&feature=share General Mouse Help: http://www.fancymice.info/ Mouse Info and Exotic Breeds: http://www.hiiret.fi/eng/species/

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I have enjoyed the companionship of mice nonstop since 2004, and spent a year caring for them in a lab where I learned a great deal about their breeding, social needs, and health. I spent a few years breeding them, specifically working with albinos, marked mice, angora mice, and satins. My education never stopped - I am learning something new every day from current and well-established research thanks to the wonderful folks at the Jackson Laboratory, as well as from my wonderful mousey friends online. I also love learning from my terrific questioners here on AllExperts - you folks keep my passion for these amazing animals alive and well!

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East Coast Mouse Association - expired, American Fancy Rat and Mouse Association - expired

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Partial University for a B.S. in Microbiology, Partial University for a 2-year degree in Veterinary Technology (RVT cert), C.E. classes in pathogens, aseptic technique, genetics, and applications

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