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Mice/Somethng red in the butt/balls of mouse

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Mouse
Mouse  
Hello! I've been taking care of my mouse for 1 year already and so far there hasn't been any problems. However today, as i was playing woth my mouse, I noticed something red sticking on it's butt/balls. I can't really describe it (but i do have a photo), but it's red, and has red spots on it.  I though that it was dirt or something, but it actually seems to be a wound. It isn't bleeding and his poop is not red, but i want to know if it's a wound, tumor, or something that needs immediate medication. I also want to know what has caused it and what I need to do with it. Thank you! :-)

Answer
Hi Kaira,

From the photos, it doesn't look very irritated, which is a good sign.  A couple of possibilities come to mind, but you'll be able to tell better than I can.  Is that a part of the anus, or below it?  If it is a part of it, it could be a prolapsed rectum.  That sounds scarier than it is, but it does need a vet to take a look at it.  Another possibility if it is below the anus is a wart, pimple, or bug bite.  I don't think it's a tumor, as usually those are beneath the skin, larger, and not discolored, but I am not a veterinarian of course.

Since one way or another it is not normal, I would bring him to a vet in your area who works with pocket pets like mice.  They will be able to check it out and let you know how to proceed next, since nothing I could potentially recommend can be done by yourself at home.  Keep a close eye on it for any sign of changes - is it changing in size?  Becoming dry, red, or puffy?  Oozing discharge of any color or bleeding?  Are all bowel movements still normal?  These are things to watch carefully for between now and your appointment, so you can give your vet as much background information as possible.

Please let me know how it goes - I'm very curious!  And of course if a vet is absolutely NOT a possibility at all, please write me back (try and get me as close and clear of a photo as you can, though these are great, too) and I'll ask other experts and see if there are any temporary solutions we can come up with.

Best of luck!
-Tam

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Tamarah

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I can answer questions regarding mice as pets, mouse behavior, color and coat genetics, breeding techniques, and general health questions. I can help with caging and setup, nutrition, social issues, and what to do in most mouse emergencies (such as unplanned litters, injuries, fighting, etc.). I can also assist with questions pertaining to orphaned mouse pups, weaning litters, and questions of mating and birthing. I cannot answer questions about exotic or wild varieties of mice such as spiny or pygmy mice. *****FOR EMERGENCIES, anything requiring immediate medical intervention, PLEASE take your mouse to a professional veterinarian or wildlife rehabilitator who works with mice as soon as possible! IMPORTANT RESOURCES: Raising Orphaned Mice: http://www.rmca.org/Articles/orphans.htm Orphaned Mice Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/CreekValleyCritters/videos?query=raising Natasha's Your First Mouse: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNK4uqNZTbA&feature=share General Mouse Help: http://www.fancymice.info/ Mouse Info and Exotic Breeds: http://www.hiiret.fi/eng/species/

Experience

I have enjoyed the companionship of mice nonstop since 2004, and spent a year caring for them in a lab where I learned a great deal about their breeding, social needs, and health. I spent a few years breeding them, specifically working with albinos, marked mice, angora mice, and satins. My education never stopped - I am learning something new every day from current and well-established research thanks to the wonderful folks at the Jackson Laboratory, as well as from my wonderful mousey friends online. I also love learning from my terrific questioners here on AllExperts - you folks keep my passion for these amazing animals alive and well!

Organizations
East Coast Mouse Association - expired, American Fancy Rat and Mouse Association - expired

Education/Credentials
Partial University for a B.S. in Microbiology, Partial University for a 2-year degree in Veterinary Technology (RVT cert), C.E. classes in pathogens, aseptic technique, genetics, and applications

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