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QUESTION: I forgot to ask...
Does the squeaking & squirming mean mouse is hungry? I'm patient with the feedings but don't want to be too forceful. I tried following the give it a rest & try again in 5 min rule. Not a successful feeding. Thx in advance for your help.

ANSWER: Hi Joy,

Yes, the squeaking means it is either hungry or uncomfortable in another way, such as cold, gassy, or in need of a pottying.

It will take some practice, but do try many different methods and positions to feed. The paintbrush method may be easiest, since she is so young.  I just responded to your last question - hopefully that will help, but let me know!

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Will Matty be able to let me know if she is too warm? What clues should I look  for?
& Thank you! I run down the checklist every time she has squeaking.

ANSWER: The only way she could tell you about her temperature is by squeaking/wiggling, same as for everything else, unfortunately. Mice are kind of like human babies - all the noises sound the same at first and you just have to check everything.

Your heating pad should be on its lowest or "warm" setting and placed below the enclosure. Putting the back of your hand against the bottom of the cage/container should feel slightly warmer than the sides, but not hot. Never place Matty directly on the pad itself or use anything concentrated like a lamp - doing so could cause overheating or burns.

Once again - you are doing a terrific job!  Let me know how she's/he's doing, and feel free to send pictures!  :)

-Tam

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: 10 days & hanging in. Good moments & bad. Increasingly difficulty feeding Matty the  past 2 days. Matty is SO eager crawling & rolling around hard to keep her from aspirating on what little food ends up in her mouth. I'm still using paint brush method while gently holding her in place with thumb & finger on each side of face beneath jaw. Is it typical for baby mice to be so enthusiastic? Also when. Do they develop teeth? I though I saw tiny tooth on bottom but worried it may be something else??? Piece on Kleenex from kleenex bedding? Thinking about switching out to tshirt. Would I just line shoebox with wit and lay her on it to sleep? Or is it ok to cover mouse  with a piece? I worry about pieces of fabric coming off if tshirt was cut...
Thx for response is advance!

Answer
I'm not sure if you tried the t-shirt yet, but I would stick to the beddings I mentioned in the other response.  Fabrics are USUALLY safe, but if she starts chewing on them, she could get tangled up in the threads.  The risk is not worth it in my opinion.  I would switch to aspen or paper beddings like Yesterday's News or Carefresh once you are less worried about her pottying on her own.

Yep, she's supposed to be super wiggly now, and she's supposed to have teeth.  I gave you some food suggestions in my other response that will help her learn how to use those chompers.  You may need to experiment with some other delivery methods of milk now that she is getting bigger, just be sure you are not forcing any into her mouth.  Either a dropper she can suck from (that you don't squeeze) or laying some out in your palm and letting her lick it up are great in addition to the paintbrush method, although now that she has become accustomed to it, she may decide she wants to stick to what she knows!  That would be fine, too, as long as she continues to gain weight.  :)

-Tam

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Tamarah

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I can answer questions regarding mice as pets, mouse behavior, color and coat genetics, breeding techniques, and general health questions. I can help with caging and setup, nutrition, social issues, and what to do in most mouse emergencies (such as unplanned litters, injuries, fighting, etc.). I can also assist with questions pertaining to orphaned mouse pups, weaning litters, and questions of mating and birthing. I cannot answer questions about exotic or wild varieties of mice such as spiny or pygmy mice. *****FOR EMERGENCIES, anything requiring immediate medical intervention, PLEASE take your mouse to a professional veterinarian or wildlife rehabilitator who works with mice as soon as possible! IMPORTANT RESOURCES: Raising Orphaned Mice: http://www.rmca.org/Articles/orphans.htm Orphaned Mice Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/CreekValleyCritters/videos?query=raising Natasha's Your First Mouse: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNK4uqNZTbA&feature=share General Mouse Help: http://www.fancymice.info/ Mouse Info and Exotic Breeds: http://www.hiiret.fi/eng/species/

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I have enjoyed the companionship of mice nonstop since 2004, and spent a year caring for them in a lab where I learned a great deal about their breeding, social needs, and health. I spent a few years breeding them, specifically working with albinos, marked mice, angora mice, and satins. My education never stopped - I am learning something new every day from current and well-established research thanks to the wonderful folks at the Jackson Laboratory, as well as from my wonderful mousey friends online. I also love learning from my terrific questioners here on AllExperts - you folks keep my passion for these amazing animals alive and well!

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East Coast Mouse Association - expired, American Fancy Rat and Mouse Association - expired

Education/Credentials
Partial University for a B.S. in Microbiology, Partial University for a 2-year degree in Veterinary Technology (RVT cert), C.E. classes in pathogens, aseptic technique, genetics, and applications

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